Preoperative ureteral stenting prior to ureteroscopy for management of urolithiasis does not impact the postoperative return for unplanned care

Conclusions: In this study, preoperative stenting offered few operative advantages and did not meaningfully influence returns to the ED and readmissions within 90 days after ureteroscopy.
Source: Urology Annals - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research

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AbstractOur objectives were to compare measurements of ureteral wall area, ureteral wall volume and ureteral wall thickness for their use in prediction of shock wave lithotripsy outcomes. We retrospectively identified 218 patients that underwent shock wave lithotripsy for ureteral calculi with pretreatment non-contrast computed tomography. We measured ureteral wall thickness, ureteral wall area and ureteral wall volume by high functional viewer. Ureteral wall thickness was defined as the maximum thickness of ureteral wall, and ureteral wall area as the area of ureteral wall around the stone in the maximal stone diameter on...
Source: Urolithiasis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Renal colic is a common complaint that presents to the emergency department. It is estimated that 13% of men and 7% of women will develop a renal stone. There is a high probability of recurrence, with 50% within 5  years. Computed tomographic scan of the abdomen and pelvis without contrast and the ultrasound of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder are the common diagnostic imaging modalities used for diagnosis. Initial treatment includes analgesics and medical expulsive therapy. Most of the patients will pass t heir stone spontaneously within 3 days. The remaining 20% will require urologic intervention.
Source: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE: To review the safety and effectiveness of tubeless percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) with an externalized ureteral catheter (EUC) compared with standard PCNL with nephrostomy tube and tubeless PCNL with double-J (DJ) stent following uncomplicated PCNL and the absence of residual stones. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with kidney stones who underwent uncomplicated PCNL between January 2000 to December 2017 and had no residual stones were retrospectively evaluated. The 766 patients were divided into standard PCNL with nephrostomy tube (group 1; 350 patients), tubeless PCNL with DJ stent (gr...
Source: Urology Journal - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Urol J Source Type: research
We present the case of a 46-year-old man who underwent successful antegrade ureteroscopy for lithiasis in his allograft ureter. At a scheduled follow-up 15  years after transplantation, computed tomography (CT) detected a 12-mm renal stone in the renal pelvis of the transplanted kidney. During his follow-up, gross hematuria was seen; the stone moved to the ureter, causing hydronephrosis. Ultrasound and non-contrast CT revealed hydronephrosis and a 15- mm stone in the transplanted ureter. Considering the stone size, location, and the difficulty of the access to the anastomosed ureteral orifice, percutaneous ureteroscop...
Source: Urolithiasis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
AbstractThe purpose of the study was to investigate variables that may predict ureteral stone impaction and create a new model to predict more accurately stone impaction based on preoperative NCCT findings. Data of 238 patients who underwent URS were analyzed. Stone size, stone location, Hounsfield unit (HU) value of the stone, ureteral wall thickness (UWT) and grade of hydronephrosis were recorded. HU values of the ureter which are measured proximal and distal to the stone were recorded. Subsequently, we determined the factors that could predict the stone impaction in univariate and multivariate logistic regression analys...
Source: Urolithiasis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeUrinary tract infection (UTI) is a common complication after flexible ureteroscopy (fURS) despite technical precautions to avoid infectious complications. The aim was to investigate incidence and predictive risk factors of UTI following fURS procedure.Patients and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study including consecutive fURS performed in our center from January 2015 to March 2019. The indications were: nephrolithiasis management and diagnosis and conservative treatment of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas (UTUC). Since 2015, we had technical precautions to avoid postoperative infectious compli...
Source: World Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Abstract INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The study was conducted to identify the risk factors of upper tract stone formation in patients with diversions after radical cystectomy (RC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients with diversion after RC were collected in our center from January 2005 to December 2013. Three different common diversions were included: Orthotopic neobladder (ON: 168 patients), Ileal Conduit (IC: 93 patients) or Ureterocutaneostomy (UC: 104 patients). Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis were conducted to identify the independent predictors of stone formation in the upper...
Source: Actas Urologicas Espanolas - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Actas Urol Esp Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeTo compare the outcomes (stone free rate and complications) of renal stone treatment with and without the use of ureteral access sheath (UAS). The worldwide use of UAS has risen over the last decade; however, questions still remain on the safety and outcomes with its use. We wanted to look at the role of UAS for treatment of consecutive renal stones over a 7-year period.MethodsThe outcomes of flexible ureteroscopy and stone treatment (FURS) for renal stones with and without the use of UAS was prospectively compared from March 2012 to July 2018. Patients were divided into two groups: group-1 where UAS was use...
Source: World Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
The authors present important information about the potential risk of secondary malignancy related to imaging for patients with nephrolithiasis. It is important to note that the authors found the absolute risk for any given patient to be low, but given the prevalence of nephrolithiasis, the overall risk for the population is significant. Whenever deciding on an imaging modality, the relative risks and benefits to the individual patient must be considered. For imaging ureteral stones, the American Urological Association does have a best practice paper which takes radiation exposure into consideration.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney stones (urolithiasis), you may have several options for treatment. These include medical therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL), and ureteroscopy. A brief anatomy of the urinary tract The urinary tract includes kidneys (two organs that filter waste and extra water from the blood) ureters (two tubes bringing urine from each kidney to the bladder) bladder (organ that collects urine) urethra (a single tube through which urine in the bladder passes out of the body). The evaluation for kidney stones If your symptoms suggest kidney...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Kidney and urinary tract Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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