Re: Clostridium difficile associated disease

Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums

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A Welsh health board has seen an almost 40% reduction in the number of cases involving the ‘superbug’ Clostridium difficle as a result of cuts to antibiotic prescribing.
Source: The Pharmaceutical Journal - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions Chronic pancreatitis patients have high burden of CDI and may benefit from CDI prophylaxis.
Source: Pancreas - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Abstract Purpose. Clostridium difficile spores are extremely resilient to high temperatures. Sublethal temperatures are associated with the 'reactivation' of dormant spores, and are utilized to maximize C. difficile spore recovery. Spore eradication is of vital importance to the food industry. The current study seeks to elucidate the transient and persisting effects of heating C. difficile spores at various temperatures.Methods. Spores of five C. difficile strains of different ribotypes (001, 015, 020, 027 and 078) were heated at 50, 60 and 70-80 °C for 60 min in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) a...
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 August 2019Source: The American Journal of SurgeryAuthor(s): Thomas K. Maatman, Jamaica A. Westfall-Snyder, Megan E. Nicolas, Elliott J. Yee, Eugene P. Ceppa, Michael G. House, Attila Nakeeb, C. Max Schmidt, Nicholas J. ZyromskiAbstractIntroductionNecrotizing pancreatitis (NP) patients commonly require antibiotic treatment during the several month-long disease course. We hypothesized that Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is common in NP and significantly impacts outcomes.Materials and methodsRetrospective review of 704 NP patients treated at a single-institution (2005–2018)....
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ARIES C. difficile Assay , REF 50-10018, UDI # 00840487100059
Source: Medical Device Recalls - Category: Medical Devices Source Type: alerts
Abstract Ribonuclease I belongs to a class of non-specific endoribonucleases and plays many important roles in a variety of biological and cellular processes. While their ubiquitous nature and high activity contribute to the well-known problem of RNase contamination in experimentation, their abundance in bacteria can potentially be leveraged as a biosensor target. As a result, there is substantial interest in generating a specific and reliable probe for RNase detection for a variety of purposes. To that end, we report on our unintentional discovery of the RNase I probe RFA13-1 isolated through in vitro selection w...
Source: Chembiochem - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Chembiochem Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 August 2019Source: The American Journal of SurgeryAuthor(s): Thomas K. Maatman, Jamaica A. Westfall-Snyder, Megan E. Nicolas, Elliott J. Yee, Eugene P. Ceppa, Michael G. House, Attila Nakeeb, C. Max Schmidt, Nicholas J. ZyromskiIntroductionNecrotizing pancreatitis (NP) patients commonly require antibiotic treatment during the several month-long disease course. We hypothesized that Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is common in NP and significantly impacts outcomes.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of 704 NP patients treated at a single-institution (2005-2018).Results10% (67...
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Scientists from the London School of Hygiene &Tropical Medicine discovered the bacteria Clostridium difficile, which causes diarrhoea, is gradually 'splitting' into two species.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) accounts for a substantial proportion of deaths attributable to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the United States. Although C. difficile can be an asymptomatic colonizer, its pathogenic potential is most commonly manifested in patients with antibiotic-modified intestinal microbiomes. In a cohort of 186 hospitalized patients, we showed that host and microbe-associated shifts in fecal metabolomes had the potential to distinguish patients with CDI from those with non–C. difficile diarrhea and C. difficile colonization. Patients with CDI exhibited a chemical signature of Sticklan...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Clostridioides difficile is a significant public health threat, and diagnosis of this infection is challenging due to a lack of sensitivity in current diagnostic testing. In this issue of the JCI, Robinson et al. use a logistic regression model based on the fecal metabolome that is able to distinguish between patients with non–C. difficile diarrhea and C. difficile infection, and to some degree, patients who are asymptomatically colonized with C. difficile. The authors construct a metabolic definition of human C. difficile infection, which could improve diagnostic accuracy and aid in the development of targeted thera...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
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