Lipids in South Asians: Epidemiology and Management

AbstractPurpose of ReviewThis review focuses on lipoprotein abnormalities in South Asians (SA) and addresses risk stratification and management strategies to lower atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in this high-risk population.Recent FindingsSouth Asians (SAs) are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States (U.S) and have an increased risk of premature coronary artery disease (CAD). While the etiology may be multifactorial, lipoprotein abnormalities play a key role. SAs have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared with Whites and at any given LDL-C level, SA ethnicity poses a higher risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with other non-Asian groups. SAs have lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) with smaller particle sizes of HDL-C compared with Whites. SAs also have higher triglycerides than Whites which is strongly related to the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SAs. Lipoprotein a (Lp(a)) levels are also higher in SAs compared with many other ethnic groups. This unique lipoprotein profile plays a vital role in the elevated ASCVD risk in SAs. Studies evaluating dietary patterns of SAs in the U.S show high consumption of carbohydrates and saturated fats.SummarySAs have a high-risk lipoprotein profile compared with other ethnicities. Lipid abnormalities play a central role in the pathogenesis of CAD in SAs. More studies are needed to understand the true impact of the various l...
Source: Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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Johanna L. Johnson1, Cris A. Slentz1*, Leanna M. Ross1, Kim M. Huffman1 and William E. Kraus1,2 1Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States 2Division of Cardiology and Urbaniak Sports Sciences Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States Background: STRRIDE (Studies Targeting Risk Reduction Interventions through Defined Exercise) was an eight-month exercise study conducted from 1998–2003. Subjects were randomized to control or one of three exercise groups differing in intensity and amount. To determine if there were legacy effects,...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusion Activation of the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant system plays an important role in cell defense against oxidative stress damage, whereas the insufficiency of the Nrf2 system is associated with multiple aspects of the genesis and progression of metabolic diseases, posing a great risk to the cardiovascular system (Figure 1). The systemic increase of Nrf2 activity by several activators may be beneficial in the treatment of metabolic diseases. In addition, selective upregulation of Nrf2 genes may represent a potential therapy in obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Looking to the future, experimental research that el...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, scientists screened cells from old animals to identify any RBPs that change upon aging. The screening showed that one particular protein, Pumilio2 (PUM2), was highly induced in old animals. PUM2 binds mRNA molecules containing specific recognition sites. Upon its binding, PUM2 represses the translation of the target mRNAs into proteins. Using a systems genetics approach, the researchers then identified a new mRNA target that PUM2 binds. The mRNA encodes for a protein called Mitochondrial Fission Factor (MFF), and is a pivotal regulator of mitochondrial fission - a process by which mitochondria break u...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Nardin M, Verdoia M, Barbieri L, De Luca G, Novara Atherosclerosis Study Group (NAS) Abstract Platelets represent one of the main actors involved in pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Mean platelet volume (MPV) has been proposed as marker of platelet reactivity and thrombotic risk. However, still debated is whether higher MPV constitutes an independent determinant of CAD or just the consequence of an association with several cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the impact of metabolic syndrome (MetS), on MPV and its relationship with angiographicall...
Source: Platelets - Category: Hematology Tags: Platelets Source Type: research
Publication date: April 2005Source: The American Journal of Medicine Supplements, Volume 118, Supplement 2Author(s): Steven K. GrinspoonUse of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with the development of cardiovascular risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, fat redistribution, and hypertension. The results of the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study showed that HAART therapy is associated with a 26% relative risk increase in the rate of myocardial infarction per year of HAART exposure. A number of...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine Supplements - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Source: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy Source Type: research
We examined associations between mortality and accelerometer-measured PA using age-relevant intensity cutpoints in older women of various ethnicities. The results support the hypothesis that higher levels of accelerometer-measured PA, even when below the moderate-intensity threshold recommended in current guidelines, are associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality in women aged 63 to 99. Our findings expand on previous studies showing that higher self-reported PA reduces mortality in adults aged 60 and older, specifically in older women, and at less than recommended amounts. Moreover, our findings challenge th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Time limit: 0 Quiz-summary 0 of 20 questions completed Questions: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Information This test series requires login for attempting. You can login easily with your Facebook account (Use the CONNECT WITH icon on the upper part of right sidebar displaying t...
Source: Cardiophile MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs
This study...
Source: Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
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