UAB Center for AIDS Research receives $7.5 million grant

The UAB Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) has received a $7.5 million grant renewal from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The grant, according to UAB, will be used to focus more intensely on the local HIV epidemic in Alabama and the Southeast. UAB leaders will research social, clinical and behavioral elements that can contribute to HIV transmission and exposure in the region.  “We’re positioned right in the epi center of the HIV epidemic in the South, which means we…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

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The UAB Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) has received a $7.5 million grant renewal from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The grant, according to UAB, will be used to focus more intensely on the local HIV epidemic in Alabama and the Southeast. UAB leaders will research social, clinical and behavioral elements that can contribute to HIV transmission and exposure in the region.  “We’re positioned right in the epi center of the HIV epidemic in the South, which means we…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news
HIV treatment has come a long way since the early days of the epidemic. Patients can now take various combinations of dozens of medications keep the virus under control and halt their disease from decimating their immune systems and leading to more serious, often fatal outcomes. But harnessing HIV requires daily vigilance. Missing doses of the pills can give the virus the chance to develop resistance to the drugs and lead to a surge in new copies of HIV that flood the body. In a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at Taiwan-based United BioPharma report encouraging results with a single ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized hiv-aids Source Type: news
Jeffrey G. Shaffer1*, Frances J. Mather1, Mamadou Wele2, Jian Li1, Cheick Oumar Tangara2, Yaya Kassogue2, Sudesh K. Srivastav1, Oumar Thiero2, Mahamadou Diakite2, Modibo Sangare2, Djeneba Dabitao2, Mahamoudou Toure2, Abdoulaye A. Djimde2, Sekou Traore2, Brehima Diakite2, Mamadou B. Coulibaly2, Yaozhong Liu1, Michelle Lacey3, John J. Lefante1, Ousmane Koita2, John S. Schieffelin4, Donald J. Krogstad1 and Seydou O. Doumbia2 1Department of Global Biostatistics and Data Science, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States 2Faculty of Medicine and Odontostomatology, Un...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) The US faces a public health crisis as the opioid epidemic fuels growing rates of certain infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, heart infections, and skin and soft tissue infections. Infectious disease and substance use disorder professionals must work together to stem this public health threat, according to an article co-authored by officials from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
About 1.1 million Americans currently live with HIV, and approximately 40,000 are infected each year, according to federal data. But in his State of the Union address, President Donald Trump promised to “eliminate the HIV epidemic in the United States within 10 years” — a plan that hinges on a multi-agency push for better diagnosis, treatment and prevention in at-risk communities, health officials said Wednesday. Trump introduced the plan during his annual address on Tuesday but offered few details. Health officials fleshed out the plan during a call with reporters on Wednesday. The initiative will be ove...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime HIV/AIDS onetime Source Type: news
Robert R. Redfield, M.D., director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), will deliver the 2018 Joseph J. Kinyoun Memorial Lecture on the intersection between the national opioid crisis and the management of infectious diseases. Titled, “ Opioids: Epidemic of Our Time and Impact on Infectious Disease, ” Dr. Redfield ’ s talk will explore the impacts of the unprecedented use of opioids in the United States on the management of infectious diseases. While overdose remains the leading cause of death among people who use opioids, this population is also disproportionately affected by viral he...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
P, Schurr E, Seddon JA, Swindells S, Tobin DM, Udwadia Z, Walzl G, Srinivasan S, Rustomjee R, Nahid P Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) has surpassed HIV to become the leading infectious killer of adults globally, causing almost 2 million deaths annually. Although this airborne disease has been treatable since 1948, global rates of TB have dropped less than two percent per year; an estimated 10 million incident cases continue to occur annually, including one million in children. While transmission of active disease is an important driver of the epidemic, the seedbed that feeds the epidemic is the more than two billion pe...
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research
Coronaviruses (CoVs) can cause severe respiratory disease with high fatality rates in humans. The 2002-2003 SARS-CoV epidemic resulted in 8098 cases and 744 deaths, and MERS-CoV, which emerged in 2012, has resulted in 2144 cases and over 750 deaths as of March 2018. Currently, there are no effective prophylactic or therapeutic measures, and because other CoVs are poised to emerge as new human pathogens, there is a need to define a general CoV vaccine solution. Past efforts to develop CoV vaccines have used whole-inactivated virus, live-attenuated virus, recombinant protein subunit, or genetic approaches.CoV spike (S) prote...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
(University of California - San Diego) The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has awarded a five-year, $15 million grant to the San Diego Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) at UC San Diego, renewing support that extends back to an original establishing grant in 1994--the height of the AIDS epidemic.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news
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