YAP/TAZ: a promising target for squamous cell carcinoma treatment

Source: Cancer Management and Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer Management and Research Source Type: research

Related Links:

Background: According to the World Health Organization, between 2 and 3 million nonmelanoma skin cancers occur each year and the incidence is continuously increasing. The current gold standard and first line of treatment is surgical excision. Nevertheless, some patients are not good candidates for surgery. Elderly patients with multiple nonmelanoma skin cancers are often not candidates for surgical excision, especially on the lower legs where wound healing may be impaired. Here we present a case of an elderly patient with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) who refused surgery due to his age.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
We report the use of dilute intralesional 5-FU 10.0 mg/mL and 16.7 mg/mL in a series of 51 NMSC lesions at a single institution. Historical billing data and manual chart review were used to identify all patients who received intralesional 5-FU at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center from July 1, 2008 to July 1, 2018 for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or keratoacanthoma (KA).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second most common skin cancer after basal cell carcinoma. While most cases are cured by excision, a substantial number of patients will develop local, regional, or distant recurrences, with the number of cSCC-related deaths approaching that from melanoma. Several clinical decisions, including the extent of surgical margins, the use of adjuvant radiation or chemotherapy, and sentinel lymph node biopsy/completion dissection, could be informed by a patient ’s relative risk of recurrence.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
In small amounts, many minerals and metals are essential for biologic function. However, at higher levels they can be toxic and/or potentially carcinogenic. Little is understood regarding metal exposure and risk of skin cancer. Exposure to chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), mercury (Hg), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn), have been largely unexplored with respect to skin cancer risk. We prospectively examined exposure to these elements and incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma in two US cohorts with available toenail samples (7124 females and 2456 males).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: Actinic keratoses (AKs) are precursor lesions to squamous cell carcinoma that arise from keratinocyte dysplasia. Treatment of AKs has traditionally involved cryotherapy, various topical agents such as topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), or combination therapy. Due to irritation with use of topical 5-FU, short-contact therapy 5-FU with cryotherapy has been reported. Vitamin D derivatives have also been reported as systemic anti-cancer agents, though clinical data for usage is limited mainly due to hypercalcemia as a dose-limiting adverse effect.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Introduction: Topical 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) under zinc oxide occlusion has been reported to be effective in reducing actinic damage and as an adjuvant to surgery for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) on diffusely photodamaged skin. It has also been shown to increase patient satisfaction as well as compliance and is tolerable without major side effects. Organ transplant patients are at an increased risk of developing skin cancer due to immunosuppressive medications. 5-FU is frequently prescribed as an at-home field treatment for diffuse actinic keratoses (AKs).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) includes basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and are the most common skin cancers in the world. This term also encompasses more rare, but aggressive tumors such as sebaceous carcinoma. Many NMSC are detected and treated in the earlier stages of development, however, if left untreated, NMSC can grow to become large, ulcerating, locally destructive, and malignant tumors that may cause functional impairment, significant pain, and bleed frequently.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
While deregulated, cell-autonomous Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is associated with the development of human cancer, particularly basal cell carcinoma, relatively little attention has been focused on accompanying changes in surrounding tissues. We have previously shown that elevated Hh signaling in the epithelium of K5-tTA;tetO-Gli2 mice leads to development of basal cell carcinoma and odontogenic keratocysts. In addition, basaloid squamous cell carcinomas (BSCCs) arise in the jaws of these mice by 6 months of age.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Carcinogenesis and Cancer Genetics Source Type: research
A previously uncharacterized pathway of vitamin D3 metabolism has been confirmed to operate in vivo, and this pathway begins with hydroxylation at C20 or C22. Resulting products, 20(OH)D3 and 22(OH)D3, have been detected in human serum and skin, and they undergo further hydroxylation to produce biologically active compounds that are noncalcemic at high pharmacologic doses. Many of these compounds have shown to inhibit growth of melanoma cells and stimulate keratinocytes differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether these novel vitamin D hydroxyderivatives will demonstrate therapeutic efficacy agains...
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Carcinogenesis and Cancer Genetics Source Type: research
We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma secondary to plantar wart in a 72-year-old Chinese woman. 20 years previously the patient found a 1-cm round grayish yellow plaque on her right heel. The lesion was diagnosed as plantar wart by every dermatologist the patient consulted, and can be gradually subsided after treatment such as cryotherapy and photodynamic therapy, but recurred frequently. 2 years previously the plaque enlarged accompanying with aggravated pain, biopsy indicated verrucous hyperplasia.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Carcinogenesis and Cancer Genetics Source Type: research
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Carcinoma | Skin Cancer | Squamous Cell Carcinoma