Impact of the Japanese Disability Homecare System on ALS Patients ’ Decision to Receive Tracheostomy with Invasive Ventilation

This study aims to fill this gap by collecting and analyzing patients’ and family members’ narratives. In Japan, about 30% of ALS patients utilize TIV. This rate is much higher than in most other developed countries. Patients’ narratives illuminate the psychological and especially the c ontextual factors of their decision-making. Many Japanese patients who currently use a ventilator say that their family members encouraged them to prolong their lives through ventilation. These family members have done so because patients are able to use long-term ventilation for only ¥1000 (around $11) per month, and can also access the latest communication devices and round the clock caregiver services in their homes at very low cost. Japanese caregivers who are supported by social systems and services including communication assistance (systems, training methods, funding), empowering facto rs such as patients’ associations, care provided by people outside the patient’s family, and a public nursing care system are able to encourage patients to decide to use longterm ventilation (provided that they are aware of the possibilities offered by these social systems and services).
Source: Neuroethics - Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

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Conclusion: Bilateral cerebral peduncle infarction may be related to cerebral perfusion insufficiency caused by the stenosis or occlusion of vertebrobasilar artery and its branches. The main clinical manifestations are locked-in syndrome and persistent vegetative state. The specific imaging feature of “Mickey Mouse ear”-like infarction is associated with a poor prognosis.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionResults showed lack of effectiveness of the task to detect voluntary brain activity and thus detect consciousness or communicate with non-responsive individuals. The application must be modified to be sufficiently satisfying for the intended end-users and suggestions are made in this regard.
Source: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine - Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research
Conclusion: Results showed lack of effectiveness of the task to detect voluntary brain activity and thus detect consciousness or communicate with non-responsive individuals. The application must be modified to be sufficiently satisfying for the intended end-users and suggestions are made in this regard.
Source: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine - Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This report illustrates the critical role of a patient-centered and goal-driven interdisciplinary team approach in the rehabilitation of persons with central pontine myelinolysis. Implications for rehabilitation Central Pontine Myelinolysis can result in profound acute disability, including incomplete locked-in syndrome. Interdisciplinary post-acute rehabilitation is beneficial in maximizing functional recovery and minimizing secondary complications for individuals with Central Pontine Myelinolysis. Ongoing clinical assessment and team collaboration contribute to progressive and comprehensive plan of care devel...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
ConclusionThe method provided better results in comparison with the other existing methods. It is an efficient approach for deceit identification for EEG based BCI.
Source: Journal of Neuroscience Methods - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Talking, conversing, exchanging words: for more than 10 million people, this seemingly simple act cannot be imagined without assistive technologies, such as voice generating devices, touch screens or text-to-speech apps. What does the digital future bring for them? How could innovations turn around the translation industry or the medical administration process? Here’s a glimpse into the future of voice and speaking. Speaking, identity, voice stereotypes Give me the key! – This simple sentence carries much more information when it’s pronounced. A weary Philippino mother could instruct her little child as s...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Cyborgization Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients apps assistive technology Health Healthcare Innovation speaking speech speech generating voice voice generating device Source Type: blogs
Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is typically used by people with severe speech and physical disabilities and is one of the main application areas for the brain–computer interface (BCI) technology. The target population includes people with cerebral palsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and locked-in syndrome. Word-based AAC systems are mainly faster than letter-based counterparts and are usually supplemented by icons to aid the users. Those icon-based AAC systems that use binary signaling methods such as single click can convert into a single-input BCI system such as event-related potential (ERP) det...
Source: IEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
AbstractExtensive scholarship has described the historical and ethical imperatives shaping the emergence of the brain death criteria in the 1960s and 1970s. This essay explores the longer intellectual history that shaped theories of neurological consciousness from the late-nineteenth century to that period, and argues that a significant transformation occurred in the elaboration of those theories in the 1960s and after, the period when various disturbances of consciousness were discovered or thoroughly elaborated. Numerous historical conditions can be identified and attributed to the production of the new theories that eme...
Source: Neuroethics - Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research
Brain computer interface that deciphers thoughts of people unable to communicate could revolutionize lives of those with completely locked-in syndrome
Source: Disabled World - Category: Disability Tags: Computer Devices and Software Source Type: news
Using a device which detects patterns in brain activity, patients paralysed by ALS can answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’ – and tell doctors they are ‘happy’ with lifeDoctors have used a brain-reading device to hold simple conversations with“locked-in” patients in work that promises to transform the lives of people who are too disabled to communicate.The groundbreaking technology allows the paralysed patients – who have not been able to speak for years – to answer “yes” or “no” to questions by detecting telltale patterns in their brain activity.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Disability Source Type: news
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