Tiny Robots Tackle Big Problems

New research papers published nearly coincidentally highlight a wide range of emerging uses for nanoscale robots in tackling some of the most vexing problems in medicine, and also might offer clues to common methods of controlling the tiny devices. One of the experiments,conducted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), explored using a microrobot to facilitate precision delivery of drugs to tumor sites. The other,conducted at the University of Pennsylvania, targets hard-to-dislodge biofilms on a wide variety of surfaces, from human teeth to catheters, water lines, and pipes. Simone Schürle, an assistant professor for responsive biomedical systems at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, was the lead author of the MIT paper; she said the field is simultaneously exploring numerous implementations while coalescing on some common principles, such as creating some sort of standard design for magnetic control of the devices. "We all have to obey the same laws of physics, so it is very likely there is a standard design that could come up," Schürle said. She also said the angle the Penn researchers are working on illustrates the wide variety of roles these microrobots might someday be able to fulfill. "I find it's a really cool application [the Penn Researchers] came up with," she said. "Something I never would have thought about, because I am really driven by the challenges the medical community is fa...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: R & D Source Type: news

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This study was carried out in accordance with the recommendations of the care and use of laboratory animals, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University. The protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, Hangzhou, China (SYXKzhe 2016-087). TABLE 1 Table 1. Composition and nutrient levels of the basal diet. Preparation of Aps and Gps The polysaccharide product had a purity of 80% and a molecular weight of 20,000–60,000. Aps was composed of hexanoic acid, glucose, fructose, rhamnose, arabinose, and galac...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study suggests that exocrine glands can be induced from pluripotent stem cells for organ replacement regenerative therapy. Replacement of Aged Microglia Partially Reverses Cognitive Decline in Mice https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/10/replacement-of-aged-microglia-partially-reverses-cognitive-decline-in-mice/ Researchers here report on a compelling demonstration that shows the degree to which dysfunctional microglia contribute to age-related neurodegeneration. The scientists use a pharmacological approach to greatly deplete the microglial population and then allow it to recover naturally. The...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, senescence of vascular cells promotes the development of age-related disorders, including heart failure, diabetes, and atherosclerotic diseases, while suppression of vascular cell senescence ameliorates phenotypic features of aging in various models. Recent findings have indicated that specific depletion of senescent cells reverses age-related changes. Although the biological networks contributing to maintenance of homeostasis are extremely complex, it seems reasonable to explore senolytic agents that can act on specific cellular components or tissues. Several clinical trials of senolytic agents are currentl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Ladies and Gentlemen, this is the moment you have all been waiting for – the day that the winners of the Medgadget Medical Sci-Fi Competition are announced and their fantastic stories are published! First, we would like to thank Eko Devices, th...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
A simple, round table with a desktop computer and a projector, where the patient and the doctor have their friendly chat. Whenever an examination is necessary, they cross the “blue line” in the room indicating the “boundaries of the clinic” elegantly. It’s definitely not rocket science, but the patient satisfaction index is soaring. What’s the secret? Radboud University Medical Centre &Cleveland Clinic leading the way into the future of hospitals The scenery takes place at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen in the Netherlands. ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design architecture future of hospital gc4 hospital design Innovation technology Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The research is in line with other studies that have reported on cancer risk and the pill. This study had the advantage of being both very large and having the longest follow-up period of any study of the effects of the pill on cancer. But we shouldn't lose sight of this study's limitations. It's not possible to say that taking the pill prevented women from getting certain cancers. It may be the case, but other confounding factors could be involved. The researchers took account of some basic factors that affect cancer risk, but not others like diet, physical exercise, weight and alcohol use. Many of the...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Pregnancy/child Source Type: news
In 2014, Behind the Headlines has covered more than 500 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. If you've been paying attention you should find this quiz easy and fun. Why not test your knowledge of 2014's health news with our month-by-month quiz? Answers are at the foot of the page (no peeking!).   In January 2016's health news... In a controversial study, monkeys were genetically engineered to develop what disorder? 1) Sex addiction 2) Bi-polar disorder 3) Autism In a similarly controversial study, what psychological condition was dismissed as a "myth" 1) Seasonal af...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports Source Type: news
Like most 4-year-olds, Phoebe Dooley loves toys, animals and stories. She has a wild imagination, a great sense of humor and a wisdom beyond her years. Her favorite color is pink. Unlike most 4-year-olds, Phoebe is battling an aggressive brain cancer that is notoriously difficult to treat. With the help of an altruistic photographer, Phoebe’s parents want to shine a light on their daughter’s story and encourage people to donate to cancer research. On March 22, 2016, Phoebe was diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a brain tumor that affects approximately 300 children in the U.S. eac...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Chicago White Sox pitcher Chris Sale, the American League’s starter for the Tuesday’s 2016 MLB All-Star Game, started chewing tobacco back in 2007. But in June 2014, he quit, and he did so for a very particular reason: the death of MLB Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn from oral cancer.  On Monday, Sale revealed to reporters that he quit the day Gwynn died and hasn’t touched chewing tobacco since. Nine years after quitting, Sale made clear just how much Gwynn’s death affected his life.  “To say that he saved my life, I don’t think it’s an understatement,” Sale said.&nbs...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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