Erythromycin-susceptible but clindamycin-resistant phenotype of ermB-PCR-positive clinical group B streptococci having IS1216E-inserted ermB.

Erythromycin-susceptible but clindamycin-resistant phenotype of ermB-PCR-positive clinical group B streptococci having IS1216E-inserted ermB. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2019 Jun 28;: Authors: Moroi H, Kimura K, Ido A, Banno H, Jin W, Wachino JI, Yamada K, Kikkawa F, Park YJ, Arakawa Y Abstract Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a pathogen causing neonatal sepsis, meningitis, and invasive infections in the elderly and people with medical conditions. Macrolide and lincosamide resistance rates of GBS are increasing worldwide. A macrolide resistance gene, erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm), typically confers MLSB phenotype. However, in this study, we recovered and characterized three clinical ermB-PCR-positive isolates of GBS with L phenotype. PCR of ermB and lnuB (lincosamide nucleotidyltransferase) genes were positive in all three clinical isolates. The ermB gene of the clinical isolates harbored C222T (N74N), T224C (I75T), and A299G (N100S) nucleotide (amino acid) substitutions and insertion of an IS1216E element at nucleotide position 643, resulting in the deletion between 643th-738th nucleotide positions of ermB gene, and suggesting loss-of-function of ErmB protein in the three clinical isolates. Since these clinical isolates are pitfalls of PCR method for detecting antimicrobial drug resistance genes, partial deletion of antimicrobial drug resistance genes, which confer contradiction between PCR detection of antimicrobial drug resistan...
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research

Related Links:

Conclusions Bacterial studies were performed more frequently than viral and other studies. Cerebrospinal fluid bacterial culture was nearly 5 times more likely to yield a contaminant than a pathogen. The frequency of viral infection was likely underestimated as only 20% were tested, mainly by culture, which is suboptimal. These data suggest diagnostic practices for the evaluation of suspected community-acquired CNS infections in children need to be modified to reflect current epidemiology and highlight the need for greater accessibility to polymerase chain reaction for viral diagnostics. Furthermore, NMDAR ab–media...
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Streptococcus agalactiae or group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the cause of early- and late-onset GBS disease in neonates and can present as septicemia, meningitis, and pneumonia. Our objective was to compare the performance of two FDA-approved nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs), the Panther Fusion and BD MAX systems, for detection of GBS in vaginal-rectal screening specimens. A total of 510 vaginal-rectal prepartum specimens were tested simultaneously in both NAATs following broth enrichment. Assay agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Overall agreement between assays was 99.0% (505/510; 95% confidence interv...
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Bacteriology Source Type: research
Purpose of review This review highlights the recent impacts of vaccines against the major bacterial causes of meningitis in children, and the challenges for further prevention of bacterial meningitis, with a focus on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and group B Streptococcus. Recent findings Conjugate vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis have resulted in dramatic reductions in bacterial meningitis globally where they have been used. Recent licensure and use of capsular group B meningococcal protein vaccines have further reduced meningococcal meningitis in infants, young children and adole...
Source: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: PAEDIATRIC AND NEONATAL INFECTIONS: Edited by Saul N. Faust Source Type: research
We report a case of recurrent meningitis due to Streptococcus B in a 2-month-old infant. Streptococcus B identified was hypervirulent clone ST-17 serotype III, which is known for its neurotropism. We found five other cases of recurrent group B streptococcal meningitis in the literature, which we report here. Many reports have identified breastfeeding and persistent colonization as the mode of transmission in recurrent Streptococcus B infections. We also discuss different ways to prevent recurrent group B streptococcal infections. Oral antibiotic therapy against carriage does not seem to be effective and there is no consens...
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major opportunistic pathogen in certain adult populations, including pregnant women, and remains a leading etiologic agent of newborn disease. During pregnancy, GBS asymptomatically colonizes the vaginal tract of 20-30% of healthy women, but can be transmitted to the neonate in utero or during birth resulting in neonatal pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, and subsequently 10-15% mortality regardless of antibiotic treatment. While various GBS virulence factors have been implicated in vaginal colonization and invasive disease, the regulation of many of these factors remains unclear. Recently, CRI...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Although neonates and infants with group B streptococcal or E coli meningitis had similar age and CSF laboratory values, patients with group B streptococcal meningitis more frequently demonstrated infarcts, while those with E coli meningitis more frequently had early onset of hydrocephalus.
Source: American Journal of Neuroradiology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: PEDIATRICS Source Type: research
Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important opportunistic bacteria that causes a wide range of infections including neonatal sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia, soft tissue and urinary tract infections (UTI). The aim ...
Source: BMC Research Notes - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Research note Source Type: research
This study determined the incidence and burden of GBS infection among neonates in association with maternal GBS screening. Methods: A retrospective cohort chart review study included all neonatal GBS disease cases identified through microbiology lab records within the first 90 days of life in the hospital from January 2004 to December 2016. Charts were reviewed to collect maternal and neonatal characteristics using a standardized form. Results: Over 13 years, of 108,609 live births, 55 GBS disease cases were identified (overall incidence, 0.51/1000 live births), 69.1% (n = 38) of those had early onset disease (EOD). ...
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Maternal-Neonatal Reports Source Type: research
Colonization of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of pregnant women with group B Streptococcus (GBS) can result in vertical transmission to neonates during labor/delivery. GBS infections in neonates can cause severe complications, such as sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia. Accurate detection is critical because administration of intrapartum antibiotics can significantly reduce transmission. We compared the clinical sensitivities of three nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs), the Hologic Panther Fusion GBS, Luminex Aries GBS, and Cepheid Xpert GBS LB assays, to that of the standard of care culture method rec...
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Bacteriology Source Type: research
Jean-Philippe Auger, Anaïs-Christelle Boa, Mariela Segura and Marcelo Gottschalk* Research Group on Infectious Diseases in Production Animals (GREMIP) and Swine and Poultry Infectious Disease Research Center (CRIPA), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada Streptococcus suis is an important porcine bacterial pathogen and a zoonotic agent causing a variety of pathologies including sudden death, septic shock, and meningitis. Though serotype 2 is the most studied serotype due to its presence worldwide, serotype 9 is responsible for the greatest number of porcine cases...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
More News: Clindamycin | Erythromycin | Genetics | Group B Streptococcus | Infectious Diseases | Japan Health | Men | Meningitis | Perinatology & Neonatology | Science | Study