The Use of Antibiotics and Risk of Kidney Stones The Use of Antibiotics and Risk of Kidney Stones

Might exposure to antibiotics increase the risk for kidney stone development? A new review explores the possible association.Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology Journal Article Source Type: news

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ConclusionsOur study demonstrated that hypertension did not independently influence the 24-h urine composition in adults without urolithiasis in China; however, we cannot make such an arbitrary conclusion that hypertension was not a risk factor for urolithiasis.
Source: World Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
A 50-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and primary hyperparathyroidism was referred for evaluation of nephrolithiasis. She had been in a motor vehicle accident 17 years before presentation. After the accident, she did not require any surgical intervention. She was subsequently told that she had lost her left kidney after the incident and only had a right kidney. She had no symptoms otherwise. Her blood pressure was 148/88 mm  Hg, but other systems were unremarkable. A chest X-ray a year before the accident did not reveal an intrathoracic mass.
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Nephrology Image Source Type: research
Kidney stone disease (KSD) is more common in individuals with hypertension (HTN) than in individuals with normotension (NTN). Urinary dysbiosis is associated with urinary tract disease and systemic diseases. H...
Source: Journal of Translational Medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Abstract The association between increased serum urate and hypertension has been a subject of intense controversy. Extracellular uric acid drives uric acid deposition in gout, kidney stones, and possibly vascular calcification. Mendelian randomization studies, however, indicate that serum urate is likely not the causal factor in hypertension although it does increase the risk for sudden cardiac death and diabetic vascular disease. Nevertheless, experimental evidence strongly suggests that an increase in intracellular urate is a key factor in the pathogenesis of primary hypertension. Pilot clinical trials show bene...
Source: American Journal of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Am J Hypertens Source Type: research
Purpose of review Men have more kidney stones compared with women; however, the difference is progressively decreasing. The reasons for higher prevalence of stones in men, as well as increasing prevalence in women, is a subject of ongoing speculation. In this review, we summarize the evidence of differences between men and women and expand on the speculative causes. Recent findings Stone incidence is rising in women and adolescent girls. Stone disease is more heritable among men than women, and women demonstrate greater influence of the unique environment. Women under the age of 50 years who have been pregnant, have m...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: CLINICAL NEPHROLOGY: Edited by David S. Goldfarb Source Type: research
Purpose of review Kidney stones are a common and preventable disorder. Certain occupations may increase risk for stone disease which will be discussed in this review. Few observational studies have examined this association. Recent findings Some occupations prevent individuals from drinking enough fluids to maintain a dilute urine or to void when they need to. People may have poor access to fluids or to bathroom facilities. These issues pose a risk for stone disease and are exacerbated by those who work in warmer climates. Individuals who do more activity while working, especially outdoors, perspire more, leading to m...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: CLINICAL NEPHROLOGY: Edited by David S. Goldfarb Source Type: research
Purpose of review Both chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney stones are major public health problems, which are closely interrelated. Recurrent kidney stones predispose to CKD although CKD seems to decrease risk of further kidney stone formation. Herein, we review new information of this interrelationship. Recent findings Several epidemiological studies in the past have shown an association between history of kidney stones and risk for CKD and CKD progression. Recent literature supports this concept and it is reviewed in this article. The issue of whether CKD protects against new kidney stone formation remains unset...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: CLINICAL NEPHROLOGY: Edited by David S. Goldfarb Source Type: research
Purpose of review Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with kidney disease and many patients receive vitamin D supplementation. Several large, well-designed clinical trials have been published in the last few years evaluating the effects of vitamin D supplementation on important outcomes for patients with kidney disease including effects on cardiovascular disease, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and kidney disease progression. Recent findings Several negative trials have been published showing no effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on cardiovascular events, kidney disease progression, and albuminuria. Long-...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: CLINICAL NEPHROLOGY: Edited by David S. Goldfarb Source Type: research
New research in pigs suggests that combining a hypertension drug and a glaucoma drug may take the pain out of passing a kidney stone.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news
(CNN) — Google users in the United States had a lot of questions about blood pressure, the keto diet and hiccups in 2019. Those topics were among the 10 most-searched health-related questions on the search engine this year, according to new data from Google. The list was based on search terms collected between January and early December. Last year, the top health-related questions Googled by people in the US included what is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, what is endometriosis and how long does weed stay in your urine. In 2017, what is lupus, how long does the flu last and what causes hiccups were some of the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Google Source Type: news
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