FDA approves first treatment for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, a rare autoimmune disease of the central nervous system

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Soliris (eculizumab) injection for intravenous use for the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) in adult patients who are anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody positive. NMOSD is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that mainly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord.
Source: World Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured FDA Regulatory Affairs Source Type: news

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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a key role in epigenetic dysregulation of immune responses in autoimmune diseases. However, their association with interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression and type 1 regulatory T cell (Tr1) function in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has yet to be defined.
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Abstract from the 2019 Midwestern Vascular Surgical Society Annual Meeting Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our results show for the first time the relationship between serum levels of galectin and the clinical parameters of patients with RA. Demonstrating their role in pathogenesis, new studies with galectins are needed to assess how they function as a biomarker in RA. PMID: 31428469 [PubMed]
Source: Autoimmune Diseases - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Autoimmune Dis Source Type: research
Abstract: Immunoglobulin gamma (Ig) type 4–related disease (IgG4-RD) is a chronic immunologic systemic disorder that has gained worldwide recognition in the past decade. This entity can affect almost every organ system, and its characteristic lesions have been found in a variety of organs such as lacrimal and salivary glands, pancreas, liver, bile ducts, lungs, kidneys, retroperitoneum, breast, aorta, thyroid, and prostate. This case reports a very rare case of IgG4-RD presenting with a cutaneous lesion in a young female patient mimicking a lymphoproliferative disorder. IgG4-RD affecting the skin is a rare entity a...
Source: The American Journal of Dermatopathology - Category: Pathology Tags: Extraordinary Case Report Source Type: research
Background: Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a common chronic autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease that commonly affects the elderly. In a review of the English-language literature, familial cases of BP are exceedingly rare. Herein, we present a fascinating case in which a father and daughter both presented with BP around the same time.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Importance: Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by hair loss. It can impose substantial psychological burden to patients including major depressive disorder (MDD), yet many patients report mental health symptoms prior to AA onset. As such, there may be a relationship between MDD and AA that acts in both directions.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Alopecia areata (AA), a chronic, relapsing hair-loss disorder, is considered to be a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) belongs to the family of cold shock protein that responds to cold stress, which has been identified as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule that triggers inflammatory responses. Recent studies have shown high-mobility group box 1 which is also one of the DAMP molecules is elevated in serum and scalp tissue of AA patients suggesting the relationship between DAMP and pathogenesis of AA.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been observed in patients with life-threatening health conditions, ranging from cancer to asthma. Autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD) are chronic, relapsing diseases that significantly impair quality of life in affected patients. Growing evidence has indicated a high degree of psychological distress associated with AIBD. Indeed, even during disease remission, many patients with AIBD can experience nonspecific symptoms similar that elicit significant anxiety and fear of recurrence of their skin disease.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Objectives: Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune T-cell mediated disease characterized by nonscarring hair loss. Beyond the primary symptom of hair loss, it results in serious functional and psychosocial impacts. Although there are existing patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments for use in this population, none of them is fit for purpose, according to FDA PRO Guidance, in the context of use (COU) in a clinical trial program to support claims of treatment benefit. The aim of this research was to better understand patient treatment priorities for AA and guide selection of relevant measurement concepts for a fit for purpose PRO measure.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is postulated to be an autoimmune disease affecting the hair follicles. Since vitamin D receptors are present both in the immune system and in the hair follicles, vitamin D is hypothesized to affect the disease. Various observational studies demonstrating lower vitamin D levels in AA compared with healthy controls were previously done in other countries. Since vitamin D level is mainly affected by sun exposure, and is subsequently dependent of geography, season and other cultural factors, studies in different countries are needed such as in the Philippines.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: GBR 830 is a first-in-class, humanized, monoclonal immunoglobulin G1 antibody that selectively blocks the binding of OX40 to its OX40L ligand, thereby reducing the longevity and efficacy of effector and memory T cells. By blocking the OX40/OX40L pathway, GBR 830 has the potential to treat various T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, including atopic dermatitis (AD). Topline results from a phase 2a study (NCT02683928) of adults with moderate-to-severe AD demonstrated that GBR 830 was safe and well tolerated.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
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