Study finds link between hypertension and air pollution

(Oxford University Press USA) A new study soon to appear in the Faculty of Public Health's Journal of Public Health, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that air pollution and living in apartment buildings may be associated with an increased risk for dangerous conditions like heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. This paper is embargoed until midnight EST on June 25.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news

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ConclusionsThe mean MPV was statistically significantly higher in the uncontrolled DM group and there was a statistically significant positive correlation between MPV and albuminuria.
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Total volume as well as duration of leisure time cross-country skiing are each continuously, inversely, and independently associated with future risk of hypertension in a white male population.
Source: Journal of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Tags: ORIGINAL PAPERS: Epidemiology Source Type: research
AbstractAimsTo determine the potential risk factors and construct the predictive model of diabetic risk among a relatively low risk middle-aged and elderly Chinese population.MethodsInformation of participants was collected in the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study, a perspective cohort study of Chinese occupational population. The main outcome was incident type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Based on the conventional risk factors of diabetes, we defined low risk participants without underlying diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, dyslipidemia, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, obesity and family history of diabetes. Tot...
Source: Acta Diabetologica - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionVitamin D is classically involved in maintaining bone and mineral health, but it has been shown to exert many extraskeletal functions, including pleiotropic effects on cardiovascular system.Materials and methodThis review aims to summarize evidences in literature about vitamin D and cardiovascular outcome.Results and conclusionsCalcitriol or 1,25(OH)2D, the active hormone, binds to the specific nuclear receptor VDR, which is expressed in rat and human heart and vasculature and has effects on myocardiocytes, smooth cells, and endothelial cells. 25-Hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD) represents the biomarker of vit...
Source: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 23 May 2019Source: Diabetes &Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &ReviewsAuthor(s): María M. Adeva-Andany, Raquel Funcasta-Calderón, Carlos Fernández-Fernández, Eva Ameneiros-Rodríguez, Alberto Domínguez-MonteroAbstractPatients with diabetes experience increased cardiovascular risk that is not fully explained by deficient glycemic control or traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking and hypercholesterolemia. Asymptomatic patients with diabetes show structural and functional vascular damage that includes impaired vasodilatio...
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionWe propose PRIP as a new therapeutic target for controlling obesity or developing novel anti-obesity drugs.
Source: Journal of Oral Biosciences - Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: research
Geng-Hong Xia1†, Chao You1,2†, Xu-Xuan Gao1, Xiu-Li Zeng1, Jia-Jia Zhu1, Kai-Yu Xu3, Chu-Hong Tan1, Ruo-Ting Xu1, Qi-Heng Wu1, Hong-Wei Zhou3, Yan He4*‡ and Jia Yin1*‡ 1Department of Neurology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Neurology, The First People's Hospital of Zunyi, Zunyi, China 3State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 4Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical Univ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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