Challenging Goliath – How Underdogs Stand A Fighting Chance

We all love an underdog story. Who isn ’t moved by the passion, grit, and determination that drives an outsider to overcome near-impossible odds? Rudy, Rocky, Million Dollar Baby, Miracle – Hollywood has captured our hearts while cashing in on this timeless trope. When it comes to the biopharmaceutical arena, however, we sometimes lo ok down upon the upstart rather than embrace its potential.Smaller companies and products often face the Herculean challenge of going up against the super-power, mega-sized pharma companies. Smaller budgets, operational teams, and fewer sales reps are viewed as insurmountable odds. Some of us over the years have been programmed to accept this as an immutable fact and therefore shy away from the challenge.I'm here to dispell these fears.  There ’s little point attempting to create a 2.0 version of what has already been completed at scale. While smaller companies and products can’t replicate or outspend the market Goliaths, they need to embrace the benefits of being an underdog and utilize it to their advantage.Three Approaches Underdogs Need to LeverageBy integrating these approaches into their marketing, smaller companies can make the most of their smaller size and gain market share.1.Focus and say noThe most important component of strategic decision making is being able to say no. The Goliaths of the world can say yes to nearly everything and dip their toes in the water everywhere. The upstart needs to say no appropr...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: Journal of Cancer PolicyAuthor(s): Brandon Maser, Lisa M. Force, Paola Friedrich, Federico Antillon, Ramandeep S. Arora, Cristian A. Herrera, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, Rifat Atun, Avram DenburgAbstractTo help understand how health systems and sociopolitical contexts intersect with and impact the performance of childhood cancer care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), we have developed a systems-level framework for analyzing the performance of LMIC childhood cancer programs within their health system contexts: The Paediatric Oncology System Integration Tool...
Source: Journal of Cancer Policy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Future Oncology, Ahead of Print.
Source: Future Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, Ahead of Print.
Source: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, Ahead of Print.
Source: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Date: Thursday, 12 19, 2019; Speaker: Cristine Delnevo, Ph.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.H.B., Director, Center for Tobacco Studies, Society and Policy Rutgers School of Public Health; Nir Eyal, D.Phil, Director, Center for Population-Level Bioethics (CPLB), Society and Policy Rutgers School of Public Health; https://epi.grants.cancer.gov/events/enrich-forum/
Source: NIH Calendar of Events - Category: American Health Source Type: events
Date: Tuesday, 12 03, 2019; Speaker: Erikka Loftfield, Ph.D., M.P.H., Research Fellow, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (NCI); https://metabolomics-sig.nih.gov/events.html
Source: NIH Calendar of Events - Category: American Health Source Type: events
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
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