Fiber-full eating for better health and lower cholesterol

The American Heart Association and the FDA recommend that we all eat at least 25 grams of dietary fiber per day. But what is it, how do we know how much we’re eating, and where did that number come from, anyway? What are the types of fiber? Dietary fiber is a good carbohydrate, also known as roughage, found in plant foods (not supplements). There are two kinds, soluble or insoluble, and both are really good for us. Soluble fiber becomes a thick gel in our intestines, which slows digestion (which keeps blood sugars from spiking) and traps fats so they can’t all be absorbed (which lowers cholesterol levels). Sources of soluble fiber include oatmeal, beans, lentils, and many fruits. Insoluble fiber helps keep our stools soft and regular, always a good thing! Sources of insoluble fiber include whole grains, beans, lentils, and most vegetables. Both soluble and insoluble fiber make us feel full, which helps us to eat less. Why is fiber so good for us? But fiber does so, so much more. In a recent research study published in The Lancet, investigators pooled the results from 243 studies looking at health effects of dietary fiber. They excluded any studies about fiber supplements — this was all about fiber from food. They ended up with data from over 4,600 people, and found a very strong relationship between higher dietary fiber intake and better health outcomes. Basically, intake of at least 25 grams of food fiber a day is associated with a lower weight, blood press...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Food as medicine Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

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Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
You probably know the basics about fiber: it’s the part of plant foods that your body cannot digest, and there are two types — soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Both types of fiber are good for us. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel. It is the form of fiber that helps lower cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of heart disease, and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber is found in black beans, lima beans, Brussels sprouts, avocado, sweet potato, broccoli, turnips, and pears. Insoluble fiber passes through the digestive system relatively intact, adding bulk to stools. It is the form of fiber th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
If you want to eat something for better health, make it fiber. That’s the advice from nutrition experts and the latest national dietary guidelines. Now, a large new review of studies on fiber, published in the Lancet, shows just how beneficial fiber can be. The nutrient substantially lowers the risk of at least four diseases—many of which don’t even directly relate to the gut. Compared to those who ate less fiber, people who ate more fiber lowered their risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and colon cancer, as well as their risk of dying early from any cause, by 15% to 30%. And the more dietary ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Diet/Nutrition healthytime Heart Disease Source Type: news
Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news
This study is the first to show that downregulation of PAPP-A expression in adult mice can significantly extend life span. Importantly, this beneficial longevity phenotype is distinct from the dwarfism of long-lived PAPP-A KO, Ames dwarf, Snell dwarf and growth hormone receptor (GHR) KO mice with germ-line mutations. Thus, downregulation of PAPP-A expression joins other treatment regimens, such as resveratrol, rapamycin and dietary restriction, which can extend life span when started in mice as adults. In a recent study, inducible knockdown of the GHR in young adult female mice increased maximal, but not median, lif...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
What are the best ways to lose weight? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Keck Medicine of USC, 500+ internationally renowned doctors at a leading academic medical center, on Quora: Learn the secret to losing weight - and improve your overall health at the same time. Fiber. It's not a sexy solution, but it's one that works wonders for maintaining a healthy weight. Beans, vegetables, fruit and grains all contain fiber, which helps keep your digestive tract clean, healthy and at peak function. But, did you know that...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In conclusion, spermidine inhibits lipid accumulation and necrotic core formation through stimulation of cholesterol efflux, albeit without changing plaque size or cellular composition. These effects, which are driven by autophagy in VSMCs, support the general idea that autophagy induction is potentially useful to prevent vascular disease. Intestinal Autophagy Important in Calorie Restriction and Longevity in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/08/intestinal-autophagy-important-in-calorie-restriction-and-longevity-in-nematodes/ Based on the evidence accumulated from many years of studies of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 27 June 2016 Source:Japanese Dental Science Review Author(s): Yosuke Yamawaki, Kana Oue, Satomi Shirawachi, Satoshi Asano, Kae Harada, Takashi Kanematsu Obesity is defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation. Chronic inflammation in fat influences the development of obesity-related diseases. Many reports state that obesity increases the risk of morbidity in many diseases, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, sleep apnea, and breast, prostate and colon cancers, leading to increased mortality. Obesity is also associated with ch...
Source: Japanese Dental Science Review - Category: Dentistry Source Type: research
by Phil Hardesty Imagine if there was a pill you could take that was free and would virtually eliminate, or at least minimize most disease processes. It would provide you with energy and strength to live your life beyond what you thought was possible. Everyone would want this pill and if it worked as well as it promised, just think of how healthy our population may be. Of course this "pill" does exist. It's called regular physical activity and exercise. According to the World Health Organization's Global Health Risks data physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death globally only behind high blood ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Levels of obesity in adults and children are rising worldwide. The World Health Organization calls the rising level "an epidemic" citing sugary drinks and processed foods as the main culprits, along with an urban sedentary lifestyle. A study published in The Lancet named "Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013" stated obesity issues "were estimated to have caused 3.4 million deaths globally, most of which were from cardiovascular causes. Research indicates that if...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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