High-Fat Diet Accelerates Carcinogenesis in a Mouse Model of Barrett ’s Esophagus via Interleukin 8 and Alterations to the Gut Microbiome

Barrett ’s esophagus (BE) is a precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Progression from BE to cancer is associated with obesity, possibly due to increased abdominal pressure and gastroesophageal reflux disease, although this pathogenic mechanism has not been proven. We investigated whether environme ntal or dietary factors associated with obesity contribute to the progression of BE to EAC in mice.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Basic and Translational —Alimentary Tract Source Type: research

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Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) after sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a concern considering the popularity of this procedure, lack of long-term data and theoretical risk of esophageal cancer development. Gastric bypass is considered the best therapeutic option for persisting reflux after SG. However up to 30% of patients suffer from post-operative GER.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: The expression of MMP-9 is most common in severe forms compared to the mild forms of GRD. PMID: 31264989 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cirugia y Cirujanos - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Cir Cir Source Type: research
AbstractIn the West, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which is a long-term complication of damage by gastroesophageal reflux, has been rising over recent decades. Two main factors are likely to account for this increase. The first is the rising incidence of central obesity which promotes gastroesophageal reflux. The second is the falling incidence ofH. pylori infection and associated atrophic gastritis which reduces the acidity and peptic activity of gastric juice, the main factors damaging to the esophageal mucosa. The rise in esophageal adenocarcinoma has been mirrored by a fall in gastric cancer consistent wi...
Source: Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Abstract The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased in recent decades, and its 5-year survival rate is less than 20%. As a well-established precursor, patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) have a persistent risk of progression to EAC. Many researchers have already identified some factors that may contribute to the development of BE and EAC, and the identified risks include gastroesophageal reflux (GER), male sex, older age, central obesity, tobacco smoking, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication, and the administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and antibiotics. The human gut harbor...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Barrett ’s esophagus (BE) is a precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Progression from BE to cancer is associated with obesity, possibly due to increased abdominal pressure and gastroesophageal reflux disease, although this pathogenic mechanism has not been proven. We investigated whether environme ntal or dietary factors associated with obesity contribute to progression of BE to EAC in mice.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Kim JJ Abstract The incidence of gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (GEJAC) in Western countries has increased in recent decades, in addition to a rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and low Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection rate have been nominated as risk factors for such cancers. Among these risk factors, the increased prevalence of GERD and obesity and the decreased prevalence of HP infection are of special interest owing to the currently increasing prevalence of GEJAC in Western countries. Altho...
Source: Journal of Gastric Cancer - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: J Gastric Cancer Source Type: research
Background: The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Europe and the United States rapidly increased from the latter half of the 1970s and exceeded that of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the latter half of the 1990s, currently accounting for approximately 60% of all esophageal carcinomas. Recently, its incidence has also increased in Japan, raising concerns that it will follow a course similar to that in Europe and the United States.Summary: The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Japan was about 2% until the 1990s, but in recent years, it has risen to 6.5 –7.1%. Causes include the increase in the in...
Source: Digestion - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 November 2018Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical GastroenterologyAuthor(s): Shao-Hua Xie, Jesper LagergrenAbstractThe two main histological subtypes of oesophageal cancer, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, have distinct risk factor profiles. For oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, tobacco smoking and excess alcohol use are the main risk factors. For adenocarcinoma, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and obesity are main risk factors, whereas tobacco smoking is a moderately strong risk factor and infection with Helicobacter pylori decreases the risk. Dietary factors m...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Abstract Esophageal cancer (EC) presents a high mortality rate, mainly due to its aggressive nature. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histological type worldwide, though, a continuous increase in esophageal adenocarcinomas has been noted in the past decades. Common risk factors associated with EC include smoking, alcohol consumption, gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's esophagus and obesity. In an effort to overcome chemotherapy resistance in oncology, it was discovered that histone acetylation/deacetylation equilibrium is altered in carcinogenesis, leading to changes in chromatin structure and al...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Conclusion: Preoperative endoscopy should be performed in order to detect GERD, BE, and potential carcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract before undergoing bariatric surgery. The long-term monitoring after SG is essential.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
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