Loperamide as a potential drug of abuse and misuse: fatal overdoses at the Medical University of South Carolina - Powell JW, Presnell SE.

Loperamide is an over-the-counter, μ-opioid receptor agonist commonly used as an antidiarrheal agent. Loperamide was thought to have minimal abuse potential due to its low bioavailability and limited central nervous system activity; however, there have be...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

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There are urgent needs for sensing devices capable of distinguishing between episodes of opioid overdose and nerve agent poisoning. This work presents a wearable microneedle sensor array for minimally invasive continuous electrochemical detection of opioid...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
IMPORTANCE: Prior lethality analyses of suicide means have historically treated drug poisoning other than alcohol poisoning as a lumped category. Assessing risk by drug class permits better assessment of prevention opportunities. OBJECTIVE: To inve...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
This study's objectiv...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
Background: The opioid epidemic continues to challenge the United States, fueled by illicitly manufactured fentanyl. All stakeholders involved in fighting the opioid epidemic, from medical providers to policy makers, will benefit from understanding ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
Background: Opioid overdose is a preventable injury leading to high morbidity and premature mortality in communities across the United States. Overdoses take place where people use drugs, including commercial and public locations like community phar...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
In 2017, prescription opioids were involved in 36% of opioid-involved overdose deaths in the United States (1). Prescription opioids can be obtained by prescription or through diversion (the channeling of regulated drugs from legal to illegal sources) (2)....
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
With the rise of the opioid epidemic, stories of addiction and its casualties feature prominently in the media with unprecedented frequency. According to the CDC, in 2016, more than 60,000 individuals died of drug overdose. Though we would like to imagine that this modern-day plague has left youths untouched, research suggests otherwise. According to the authors of Brief Interventions for Adolescent Alcohol and Substance Use, “when considering substance use etiology and interventions, one obvious reason to focus on adolescence is because that’s where the drugs are” (p 17).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Book forum Source Type: research
Of the 70,237 drug overdose deaths in the United States in 2017, approximately two thirds (47,600) involved an opioid (1). In recent years, increases in opioid-involved overdose deaths have been driven primarily by deaths involving synthetic opioids other ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
BACKGROUND: North America remains in the midst of an escalating opioid overdose epidemic, largely driven by the influx of synthetic opioids such a fentanyl and related analogues. High rates of mental illness among substance-using populations have been well...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
Background: To address the alarming rise in opioid overdose deaths, states have increased public access to the overdose reversal medication, naloxone. While some studies suggest that increased naloxone accessibility reduces opioid overdose deaths, o...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
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