AI System Can Identify Cardiac Arrest by Listening to Breathing

Researchers at the University of Washington have used machine learning to teach an AI system to identify when someone is having a cardiac arrest. The system learned to identify agonal breathing, which occurs when someone gasps for breath during cardi...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiology Emergency Medicine Informatics Net News cardiac arrest heart attacks Source Type: blogs

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Conclusions: Embolism associated with asymptomatic carotid stenosis shows circadian variation with highest rates 4–6 h before midday. This corresponds with peak circadian incidence of stroke and other vascular complications. These and ASED Study results show that monitoring frequency, duration, and time of day are important in ES detection. Introduction Transcranial Doppler (TCD) detected microembolism in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) may help stratify the risk of stroke and other arterial disease complications in persons with advanced (≥60%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis. If so, this techniqu...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In conclusion, self-reported habitual snoring was not associated with incident CVD among this large African American cohort. Future studies providing objective data on snoring and sleep apnea may provide more information on the snoring-CVD association among African Americans. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Identification Number: NCT00005485. PMID: 30756321 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
ConclusionIn conclusion, self-reported habitual snoring was not associated with incident CVD among this large African American cohort. Future studies providing objective data on snoring and sleep apnea may provide more information on the snoring-CVD association among African Americans.Trial registrationIdentification Number: NCT00005485
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion This relatively large cross-sectional analysis has found a link between certain measures of breathing problems during sleep and poorer cognitive function in middle-aged to older adults. The strengths of this study include its size and use of a prospective sleep study to assess whether people had sleep apnoea or other problems with breathing during sleep. The use of standard cognitive tests is also a strength. However, the study does have its limitations: The study did have mixed findings – while certain measures of problems with breathing during sleep (e.g. oxygen levels) were associated with cognitive o...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 52-year-old man is evaluated for the sudden onset of erectile dysfunction that has persisted for 6 months. He reports having erections that are inadequate for vaginal penetration. He feels guilty about not being able to satisfy his wife’s requests for sexual intercourse, although he still has sexual desires. He has been sleeping poorly and feeling fatigued throughout the day. He reports no snoring or daytime somnolence, and his review of systems is otherwise negative. His wife does not repor...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Primary care Source Type: blogs
What if I need a sleep study? If you are one of the approximately 35% of Americans who snore, perhaps this has crossed your mind. You have read on the internet or watched a newscast about sleep apnea, a condition associated with an increase in heart attack and stroke risk. Loud snoring, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and observed pauses in breathing at night are the most frequent symptoms. A sleep study is necessary to make the diagnosis. To many people, the thought of a sleep study raises visions of being restrained in a bed with wires attached everywhere and complete strangers watching you, in other words, “Big Broth...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Sleep Source Type: blogs
Sleep is a critically important component of human existence. On average, humans spend about 25%-35% of their lives sleeping. Sleep allows both the body and brain to rest and recover from the stress of daily life. As such, trouble sleeping can cause a range of health problems, and if left untreated dire consequences. Longing for more sleep There is a common misconception that there is an exact amount of sleep that the body requires. The necessary hours of sleep can vary, as some people can require as little as five hours or as much as nine hours to function optimally. In addition, too little or too much sleep can cause pro...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Prevention Sleep Source Type: blogs
By Brandon R. Peters, MD As my 81-year-old grandma likes to remind me on occasion, "It's hell to get old." More than a nuisance, the cumulative decline that comes with aging can significantly compromise one's quality of life and health. What if some of the problems so often associated with growing older didn't need to occur? Better yet, what if some of these physical and mental impairments could be reversed? Consider the role of sleep apnea as an unexpected contributor to many ailments erroneously attributed to aging and the reversals possible with effective treatment. Sleep Changes with Age It is clear that s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusions: SAVE provides the first definitive randomised controlled trial evidence on the effectiveness of CPAP therapy on future CV events in patients with CV disease and co-occurring OSA.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: 4.2 Sleep and Control of Breathing Source Type: research
International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-3) criteria for OSAS specifies an AHI ≥5/h and ≥ one OSA symptom or associated medical/psychiatric disorder. A recent prevalence of 74.7% in men ≥40y suggests criteria are too inclusive (1). We determined the prevalence of ICSD-3 OSAS using a more conservative hypopnea definition (AASM 2005 alternate criteria) and a higher AHI cut-off of ≥10/h.Methods: Population- based study of men aged ≥40y in Adelaide, Australia (MAILES). Men with no prior OSA diagnosis (n=837) had full in-home polysomnography [mean age (SD): 61.0 (10.9); BMI: 28.6 (4.3)]. The prevalen...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: 4.2 Sleep and Control of Breathing Source Type: research
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