Statins May Be Beneficial After Radiation to Thorax, Head, Neck

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 -- For cardiac patients with thorax and head or neck cancer, statin use after radiation therapy is associated with a significant reduction in stroke incidence and a trend toward reduced cardiovascular and cerebrovascular...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

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Abstract Background: Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) treat an expanding range of cancers. Consistent basic data suggest that these same checkpoints are critical negative regulators of atherosclerosis. Therefore, our objectives were to test whether ICIs were associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and a higher risk of atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular events. Methods: The study was situated in a single academic medical center. The primary analysis evaluated whether exposure to an ICI was associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular events in 2842 patients and 2842 controls, matched by age, a history o...
Source: Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circulation Source Type: research
In conclusion, it remains unclear if brain-specific regional and temporal changes occur in the expression of the different APP variants during AD progression. Since APP is also found in blood cells, assessing the changes in APP mRNA expression in peripheral blood cells from AD patients has been considering an alternative. However, again the quantification of APP mRNA in peripheral blood cells has generated controversial results. Brain APP protein has been analyzed in only a few studies, probably as it is difficult to interpret the complex pattern of APP variants and fragments. We previously characterized the soluabl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
“Lifestyle medicine is only for rich people, right?” a colleague asked me several years ago, questioning my involvement in this relatively new field of medicine that guides people toward healthy habits. This has been a common misperception, for sure. But across the US, a revitalized brand of health activism is intent on bringing lifestyle medicine to a broader range of people. This is backed by a new effort from the American College of Lifestyle Medicine to engage communities most affected by chronic disease. The first pillar of healthy lifestyle: Food is medicine Lifestyle medicine is an evidence-based practic...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Food as medicine Health Health care disparities Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: There was a dose-dependent correlation between adult height and adverse lipid profile in premenopausal Korean women who did not have CVD. This finding could serve as further evidence that dyslipidemia can be a link between shortness and CVD.Cardiology
Source: Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Multimorbid patients with ACS are at a greater risk for worse outcomes than their nonmultimorbid counterparts. Lack of consistent measurement makes interpretation of the impact of multimorbidity challenging and emphasizes the need for more research on multimorbidity's effects on postdischarge healthcare utilization. PMID: 32925234 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: J Cardiovasc Nurs Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeCardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of death among 5-year cancer survivors. Survivors see many providers and poor coordination may contribute to worse CVD risk factor control. We sought to determine associations between fragmentation and CVD risk factor control among survivors overall and by self-rated health.MethodsWe included REGARDS participants aged 66+  years who (1) had a cancer history; (2) reported diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia; and (3) had continuous Medicare coverage. Twelve-month ambulatory care fragmentation was calculated using the Bice-Boxerman Index (BBI). W...
Source: Journal of Cancer Survivorship - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of VRK-1 in regulation of adult life span in C. elegans. We found that overexpression of VRK-1::GFP (green fluorescent protein), which was detected in the nuclei of cells in multiple somatic tissues, including the intestine, increased life span. Conversely, genetic inhibition of vrk-1 decreased life span. We further showed that vrk-1 was essential for the increased life span of mitochondrial respiratory mutants. We demonstrated that VRK-1 was responsible for increasing the level of active and phosphorylated form of AMPK, thus promoting longevity. A Fisetin Variant, C...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions It is suggested we should take sufficient care of postmenopausal females with depression and control blood pressure and glucose more effectively. Abbreviations HP: Hypertension; DM: Diabetes; TC: Cholesterol; TG: Triglyceride; BMI: Body-Mass Index; CES-D: Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression; CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; HR: Hazard Ratio; CI: Confidence Interval; ADL: Activities of daily living scale. PMID: 32715792 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical and Experimental Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Clin Exp Hypertens Source Type: research
In this study, we applied a well studied prediction model developed on data from five CpG sites, to increase the practicability of these tests. We have determined the biological age of the heart, specifically of the right atrium (RA) and left atrium (LA), and of peripheral blood leucocytes, by measuring the mitotic telomere length (TL) and the non-mitotic epigenetic age (DNAmAge). We found that DNAmAge, of both atrial tissues (RA and LA), was younger in respect to the chronological age (-12 years). Furthermore, no significant difference existed between RA and LA, suggesting that, although anatomically diverse and ex...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Have you ever spent the day in a city with such bad air pollution that when you blew your nose the mucus had a black tinge? Have you ever coughed as you breathed in diesel fumes from a passing bus and thought to yourself, “Well, that’s a year gone from my life”? Could it actually be true — that air pollution leads to an early death? The answer, in fact, is an unqualified yes. Air pollution causes heart disease, lung disease, and early death It has been known for some time that air pollution causes lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, asthma, heart disease, and stroke. One r...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Environmental health Healthy Aging Memory Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs
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