San Francisco Board of Supervisors Poised to Deliver Huge Gift to Philip Morris

Philip Morris - the nation's largest cigarette manufacturer - is about to land a huge legislative gift from the most unlikely of sources: the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.Earlier today, the Board approved an ordinance that will ban the sale of all electronic cigarettes in the city, including both brick-and-mortar and online sales. Before it becomes law, the ordinance is subject to a final vote, which is expected to take place next week.The Philip Morris USA cigarette company could not have dreamed for a more favorable legislative gift from the city of San Francisco. Right now, the chief competitor to the sale of the company's deadly cigarettes is vaping products, which are today the most widely used and most effective product for smoking cessation. In fact, there are at least 2.5 million ex-smokers in the United States who have successfully quit smoking using e-cigarettes and who remain dependent on the availability of these products to stay off cigarettes. However, in San Francisco, unless the Board reverses its decision, these products will soon be taken off the market.Absurdly, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors is allowing the continued, unfettered sale of real cigarettes -- the ones that kill more than 400,000 Americans (including more than 40,000 Californians) each year. The nation's leading brand of cigarettes - which is literally the #1 cause of preventable death in the country - is Marlboro. Due to a giant exemption in the ordinance, Philip Morris will be a...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

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Approximately 2.3 million people incarcerated in the United States, 43% are expected to be re-institutionalised after their release. How could puppies help buck the trend?
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Background: Immigrant mothers are raising an increasing proportion of the population of children in the United States. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to explore existing research on immigrant women's experiences of being mothers in the United States and identify key concepts, gaps in the literature, and implications for future research that builds on the strengths of immigrant women while addressing their unique challenges. Study Design and Methods: In this scoping review, Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science, JUSTOR, and PsycINFO databases were searched using a combination of applicable key words....
Source: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature: CE Connection Source Type: research
Background: The United States has the highest number of oocyte donation cycles, which account for an estimated one-quarter of all worldwide oocyte donation cycles. Although there has been a steady rise in oocyte donation treatment, understanding the kinship views of those intimately involved is lacking. These include women oocyte donors and parents who received donor oocytes to establish a pregnancy. Purpose: To explore the views and perspectives about genetic relationships and lineages among women who were oocyte donors and parents who received donated oocytes 10 to 12 years after donors and parents underwent oocyte ...
Source: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature Source Type: research
Background: Postpartum depression (PPD) affects one in seven women in the United States. Korean Americans are one of the six largest Asian American (AA) subgroups, representing 9% of the AA population in the United States. Women of Asian descent have not always been represented in studies of PPD. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to understand postpartum experiences, perceptions of PPD, and mental health help-seeking among Korean women living in the United States. Methods: Individual, face-to-face, semistructured interviews of Korean immigrant women, over age 18, who were able to read, write, and speak English...
Source: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: CE Connection Source Type: research
During your career, it's likely that you'll care for individuals with opioid dependence or addiction. Knowing the basics will help you understand these patients and improve their outcomes.
Source: Nursing Made Incredibly Easy - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature: CE Connection Source Type: research
By KIP SULLIVAN Managed care advocates see quality problems everywhere and resource shortages nowhere. If the Leapfrog Group, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, or some other managed care advocate were in charge of explaining why a high school football team lost to the New England Patriots, their explanation would be “poor quality.” If a man armed with a knife lost a fight to a man with a gun, ditto: “Poor quality.” And their solution would be more measurement of the “quality,” followed by punishment of the losers for getting low grades on the “quality” report card and...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CMS Kip Sullivan value-based care Source Type: blogs
Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like naproxen are and have been the go-to “benign” pain medication for doctors and patients alike. Why? They aren’t addictive, and it’s not easy to overdose. Serious side effects like gastrointestinal ulcers and bleeding seemed to be limited to high doses taken for longer periods or time, or to people with significant medical problems. Even before the era of the opioid epidemic, it was raining NSAIDs, across the country. In 2004, the manufacturer of the NSAID Vioxx pulled it from the market because the drug was associated with serious...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Heart Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
By JOSEPH KRAININ, M.D. His voice had the unusual ability to convey both aggressive muscularity and profound vulnerability. Scott Weiland and Stone Temple Pilots were icons of my adolescence. Personally, my memory of Mr. Weiland will always be inextricably linked with “Plush,” that initial hit single which, upon first listen, instantly captivated me and thousands of other kids like me. During my high school days, “Plush” was elevated to the highest sonic status possible, joining Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” and Pearl Jam’s” Black” as an essential component of our f...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: THCB Pain Scott Weiland Stone Template Pilots Source Type: blogs
Who is watching the watchers?  A story this week involving "speed" like drugs added to "dietary supplements" suggests how far the once respected US Food and Drug Administration has fallen.An Amphetamine-Like Drug Spiking "Nutritional Supplements" The story began with a paper by Cohen and colleagues published a relatively obscure medical journal, and then picked up by the news media.(1)  The main points of the article were:BMPEA (beta-methylphenylethylamine) is a compound first synthesized in the 1930s as a "potential replacement" for amphetamines.  Animal tests reveale...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Management Tags: amphetamines conflicts of interest FDA health care corruption revolving doors You heard it here first Source Type: blogs
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