Evaluation of a fusion gene-based DNA prime-protein boost vaccination strategy against Newcastle disease virus

In this study, groups of chickens were vaccinated twice intramuscularly at 14-day interval either with plasmid DNA encoding F protein gene of NDV or with recombinant F protein alone or with plasmid DNA and boosted with the recombinant F protein and compared with birds that were vaccinated with live NDV vaccine. The immune response was evaluated by indirect ELISA, lymphocyte transformation test, virus neutralization test, cytokine analysis, immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and protective efficacy study against virulent NDV challenge virus infection. Chickens in prime-boost group developed a higher level of humoral and cellular immune responses as compared with those immunized with plasmid or protein alone. The DNA prime-protein boost using F protein of NDV yielded 91.6% protection against virulent NDV challenge infection better than immunization with DNA vaccine (66.6%) or rF protein (83.3%) alone. These findings suggest that the “DNA prime-protein boost” approach using full-length F gene could enhance the immune response against NDV in the chickens.
Source: Tropical Animal Health and Production - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Transgenic Research - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Transgenic Res Source Type: research
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Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
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