Gastroesophageal reflux –related physiologic changes after sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a prospective comparative study

The development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a major concern as it affects the quality of life of the patients and potentially exposes them to the complications of GERD. The reported incidence of GERD after LSG is up to 35%. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is considered the procedure of choice for patients with morbid obesity with GERD but objective evidence based on physiologic studies for the same are limited.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research

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The development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a major concern as it affects the quality of life of the patients and potentially exposes them to the complications of GERD. The reported incidence of GERD after LSG is up to 35%. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is considered the procedure of choice for patients with morbid obesity with GERD but objective evidence based on physiological studies for the same are limited.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
ConclusionHiatal repair with gastropexy is an acceptable treatment option for GERD after LSG but not very effective because of partial remission of symptoms.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
This study aimed to assess practice patterns regarding concomitant HH repair (HHR) during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). The incidence of concomitant HHR with LSG or LRYGB was analyzed using the 2015 Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program database. One hundred thirty thousand, seven hundred seventy-two patients underwent RYGB (30.5%) and LSG (69.5%). Concomitant HHR was more common, despite less GERD, in SG patients compared to RYGB (21.0% vs 10.8%,p 
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundSleeve gastrectomy (SG) has become the most performed bariatric procedure to induce weight loss worldwide. Unfortunately, a significant portion of patients show insufficient weight loss or weight regain after a few years.ObjectiveTo investigate the effectiveness of the single anastomosis duodenoileal (SADI) bypass versus the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) on health outcomes in morbid obese patients who had undergone SG previously, with up to 2  years of follow-up.MethodsFrom 2007 to 2017, 140 patients received revisional laparoscopic surgery after SG in four specialized Dutch bariatric hospitals. Da...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Background: GERD can occur de novo in up to 30% of patients after Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG). Most patients are successfully managed with lifestyle modifications and medical therapy. However, GERD refractory to medical therapy is difficult to manage with many patients requiring conversion Laparoscopic Roux En Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB). Recently, Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation (MSA) has been proposed as a less morbid alternative for the relief of GERD.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) placement is a safe and efficacious treatment for morbid obesity, however this procedure can result in insufficient weight loss or long term weight regain [1,2]. In addition, some patients experience intolerable chronic symptoms such as epigastric pain or intractable acid reflux due to band migration.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original research Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur results showed that primary LSG is a durable primary bariatric procedure with sustained weight loss and a high resolution of comorbidities at 10  years, but about half the patients had de novo GERD. The need for conversion to RYGB was 16.9% at 10 years.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionPatients with bile reflux after OAGB/MGB need a high index of suspicion to detect unusual causes. Gastrogastric fistula is an unusual etiology of bile reflux that was never reported in the literature previously.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) can result in de novo and worsen preexisting gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Post-LSG patients with GERD refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPI) usually undergo more invasive, anatomy-altering Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) electrical stimulation (ES) preserves the anatomy and has been shown to improve outcomes in GERD patients.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) can result in de novo and worsen preexisting Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Post-LSG patients with GERD refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI) usually undergo more invasive, anatomy-altering gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). Lower Esophageal Sphincter (LES) electrical stimulation (ES) preserves the anatomy and has been shown to improve outcomes in GERD patients.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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