Response to Letter to the Editor re 'electrical stimulation for overactive bladder in children: a pilot study'

I would like to express thanks for the interest shown in our article and this new way of treating lower urinary tract dysfunction in children and adolescents. Perhaps we have not been clear and have been misunderstood regarding our comments about percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS) being more convenient than transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). In fact, PENS can be performed once per week and, by coming close to S3 and without the impedance of the skin, the effectiveness may be greater.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

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I would like to express thanks for the interest shown in our article and this new way of treating lower urinary tract dysfunction in children and adolescents. Perhaps we have not  been clear and have been misunderstood regarding our comments about percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS) being more convenient than transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). In fact, PENS can be performed once per week, and, by coming close to S3 and without the impedance of the skin, the effectiveness may be greater.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
In children with overactive bladder, neuromodulation using TENS units has yielded modest results compared to posterior tibial (PT) nerve stimulation, which has demonstrated better results. While nocturnal enuresis (NE) does not have a singular cause, presacral neuromodulation has yielded little improvement. We intend to determine whether TENS can be effective in patients with NE when applied to various strategic anatomic locations.
Source: The Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Pediatrics: Dysfunctional Voiding & Enuresis Source Type: research
Parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has emerged as an effective treatment for overactive bladder (OAB) in view of its high success rates in improving lower urinary tract symptoms and constipation, with no direct side effects. However, the clinical characteristics associated with the outcomes remain to be established.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, we propose a novel approach that combines TENS with an implanted, electrically-conductive nerve cuff to reduce the stimulation amplitude needed to activate the tibial nerve. This enhanced version of TENS (called eTENS) was designed using a computational model of the rat tibial nerve and subsequently tested in anesthetized rats. Our computational model showed that eTENS can reduce the nerve activation threshold by a factor of up to 2.6. Similar effects were also achieved by in vivo experiments (1.4 ± 0.1-fold decrease, n = 5). Among various design parameters, spatial alignment betwe...
Source: Annals of Biomedical Engineering - Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: Tags: Ann Biomed Eng Source Type: research
Lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction in children has a broad spectrum of presentation. Patients may experience symptoms related to overactive bladder (OAB), voiding postponement, dysfunctional voiding (DV) or underactive bladder (UAB). Using the same treatment method will seldom have the same effective action under these different conditions when there are perhaps different pathophysiological etiologies.
Source: The Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Conclusion The UDS showed that the effects of PEMFT in patients with neurogenic OAB secondary to suprasacral SCI was better than TENS for inducing an inhibitory effect on neurogenic detrusor overactivity.
Source: Arab Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONThere is no immediate objective effect of TENS on bladder activity assessed by natural fill urodynamics in children with OAB and DUI.
Source: Neurourology and Urodynamics - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: There is actually an insufficient concern about urinary symptoms in normal pressure hydrocephalus. This article highlights the importance of a harmonization of neuro-urological practices in the pre-therapeutic evaluation of patients suffering from normal pressure hydrocephalus. PMID: 27816462 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Progres en Urologie - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Prog Urol Source Type: research
Parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an effective method for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), and, additionally, it accelerates bowel transit time. Therefore, not only does parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), but it also resolves the problem of constipation in a significant number of children. Since TENS has a positive effect on LUTS and on the symptoms of fecal retention, it is possible that its action regarding OAB could be directly associated with the improvement in constipation.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Conditions:   Urge Incontinence;   Overactive Bladder Intervention:   Device: Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Sponsor:   University of Rochester Recruiting - verified October 2016
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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