Wrist-Sensor Pulse Oximeter Enables Prolonged Patient Monitoring in Chronic Lung Diseases

AbstractPulse oximetry is an important diagnostic tool in monitoring and treating both in-patients and ambulatory patients. Modern pulse oximeters exploit different body sites (eg fingertip, forehead or earlobe). All those are bulky and uncomfortable, resulting in low patient compliance. Therefore, we evaluated the accuracy and precision of a wrist-sensor pulse oximeter (Oxitone-1000, Oxitone Medical) vs. the traditional fingertip device. Fifteen healthy volunteers and 23 patients were recruited. The patient group included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (N = 8), asthma (N = 6), sarcoidosis (N = 5) and others. Basic demographic data, skin tone type, smoking status and medical history were recorded. Blood oxygen level (SpO2) and pulse-rate values were determined by a non-invasive pulse oximeter (Reference, a conventional FDA-cleared fingertip pulse oximeter) and by Oxitone-1000. All t ests were performed in singleton and in a blinded fashion. The measurements were done in sitting and standing positions, as well as after a 6-min walk test. The mean age was 60.4 ± 9.83 years, 55% were male. No significant differences were observed between the wrist-sensor and the traditional fingertip pulse oximeters in all tested parameters. Mean SpO2 was 96.45% vs. 97.18% and the mean pulse was 74.64 vs. 74.6 bpm (Oxitone-1000 vs. Reference, respectively,p 
Source: Journal of Medical Systems - Category: Information Technology Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Workplace exposures contribute to the burden of disease across a range of nonmalignant lung conditions in adults (in addition to the 100% burden for the classic occupational pneumoconioses). This burden has important clinical, research, and policy implications. There is a pressing need to improve clinical recognition and public health awareness of the contribution of occupational factors across a range of nonmalignant respiratory diseases. PMID: 31149852 [PubMed - in process]
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research
Poshmaal Dhar1 and Julie McAuley2* 1Faculty of Health, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Peter Doherty Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia The family of cell surface (cs-) mucins are constitutively expressed at the cell surface by nearly all epithelial cells, beneath the gel-mucin layer. All cs-mucin family members have structural features that enable them to act as a releasable decoy barrier to mucosal pathogens, by providing ligands for pathogen binding and the ability to shed the bound extracellular domain. Due ...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
​BY GORDON MURPHY, PA-C, MPHThe patient was blue, her primary care physician noted. Quite literally, in fact.The 38-year-old woman had sought care for a recurrent urinary tract infection, and that's when her primary care physician found her pulse oximetry to be 74%. He was concerned about hypoxia and asked us to evaluate her.The patient reported taking an SSRI for anxiety and having a hormone-eluting IUD. She had previously had a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. She said she had a headache, but had been instructed not to take NSAIDs. She said she had just finished a course of Cipro for her UTI, but continued to be symptomatic w...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
In September 2016, the ERS Science Council commissioned a Task Force (TF-2016-12) to report on standardisation of CPET in chronic lung diseases. The main objective of the TF was to agree on the format of CPET protocols and respective outcome measures.In order to gather patient/participant experience on CPET, the European Lung Foundation (ELF) - in collaboration with the TF - conducted an online survey from November 2017 to January 2018; the survey was translated into 9 languages.There were 295 responders from 34 countries; the majority were patients with COPD (26%), sarcoidosis (18%), cystic fibrosis (16%) and asthma (13%)...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical respiratory physiology, exercise and functional imaging Source Type: research
Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are main effector molecules in innate immunity against respiratory pathogens. Relatively little is known about the levels of AMPs in respiratory secretions in different chronic lung diseases.Methods: 93 healthy controls, 75 COPD patients, 14 asthma patients, 38 sarcoidosis patients and 25 patients with other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) underwent bronchoscopy including sampling of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and human beta-defensin-1 (hBD-1) were measured in BAL with enzyme immunoassays. Median values in the different diseases an...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Problems Source Type: research
Purpose of review Sarcoidosis is a chronic disease, which is routinely treated with corticosteroids. Steroid resistance or steroid-induced adverse effects require alternatives. Other immune-modulating pharmacological treatments have been developed, and therefore expanded tremendously. Until now, the role of nutrition in the overall management of sarcoidosis has been neglected although anti-inflammatory properties of nutritional components have been known for many years now. New nutritional possibilities emerge from already existing data and offer new therapeutic avenues in the treatment of sarcoidosis. Recent findings ...
Source: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: SARCOIDOSIS: Edited by Peter Korsten and Marjolein Drent Source Type: research
Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also known as stress proteins, constitute a complex network of proteins highly conversed across species that have been classified into different families according to their molecular weight: HSP110, HSP90, HSP70, HSP60, HSP40 and the small HSPs [1]. Although they are mainly known for their chaperone and cytoprotective properties, HSPs also participate in the regulation of many cellular signalling processes [2]. These proteins have been involved in various physiological as well as pathological conditions, including respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoi...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Lung biology and experimental studies, Interstitial and orphan lung disease Editorials Source Type: research
Abstract Dust storms are strong winds which lead to particle exposure over extensive areas. These storms influence air quality on both a local and global scale which lead to both short and long-term effects. The frequency of dust storms has been on the rise during the last decade. Forecasts suggest that their incidence will increase as a response to the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activities. Elderly people, young children, and individuals with chronic cardiopulmonary diseases are at the greatest risk for health effects of dust storms. A wide variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases have b...
Source: Environmental Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Res Source Type: research
Background: Multiple breath washout (MBW) showed promising results in the assessment of ventilation heterogeneity in pulmonary disease. However, the test is rather time consuming and according to current ERS/ATS recommendations three technically acceptable measurements should be reported. Available data for optimizing test methodology is mostly restricted to nitrogen based devices and infant lung disease. We therefore aimed to evaluate the number of required measurements in adults using sulfur hexafluoride MBW.Methods: LCI was derived from three consecutive MBW tests in pulmonary healthy controls (n=19) as well as patients...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Monitoring Airway Disease Source Type: research
Quantitative CT (QCT) is carried out with attention to quality control (scanner make and model, calibration, lung volume and acquisition protocol), and bears financial and radiation cost. We wished to determine if non-research CT scans without such controls could yield reproducible data. 62 subjects (53 COPD, 6 asthma, 2 micronodules, 1 sarcoidosis) from a community respirology practice had had 2 non-contrast CT scans judged free of significant infiltrates, performed on 5 models of scanner in 9 different community hospitals for clinical indications within 14 months and had available spirometry and lung volumes performed re...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Imaging Source Type: research
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