Personalised medicine in urothelial bladder cancer.

[Personalised medicine in urothelial bladder cancer]. Aktuelle Urol. 2019 Jun 13;: Authors: Grunewald CM, Niegisch G Abstract Available treatment options and outcomes for patients suffering from urothelial bladder cancer, especially in the metastatic stage, have hardly improved over decades. However, the increasing use of high-throughput analyses and the concept of immune surveillance against tumours have recently changed our understanding of tumour biology in terms of tumour development and progression. Our knowledge of genetic mutations and molecular subtypes provides the possibility of tailor-made therapeutic approaches for patients suffering from bladder cancer. For example, changes in DNA repair signalling pathways are possible predictors of chemotherapy response, and targeted therapies using FGFR or PARP inhibitors are currently being tested in clinical trials. The extent to which molecular subtypes will find their way into clinical practice depends on the prospective evaluation of their prognostic and predictive value. The introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors is probably the most significant expansion of available treatment options in bladder cancer. Despite their promising results, however, a lot of questions remain to be answered, as only 25 % of patients respond. Again, this highlights the need for predictive biomarkers. The large inter- and intratumoural heterogeneity represents a particular challenge for the clinical implementation ...
Source: Aktuelle Urologie - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Aktuelle Urol Source Type: research

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AbstractIn the last few years, immunotherapy has transformed the way we treat solid tumors, including melanoma, lung, head neck, breast, renal, and bladder cancers. Durable responses and long-term survival benefit has been experienced by many cancer patients, with favorable toxicity profiles of immunotherapeutic agents relative to chemotherapy. Cures have become possible in some patients with metastatic disease. Additional approvals of immunotherapy drugs and in combination with other agents are anticipated in the near future. Multiple additional immunotherapy drugs are in earlier stages of clinical development, and their ...
Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: CANCER GENETICS IN UROLOGIC PRACTICE: Edited by Todd M. Morgan and Brian Chapin Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study was supported by the Shanghai Sailing Program [grant number 17YF1425200, 2017]; Chinese National Natural Science Funding [grant number 81702249, 2017]; Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality [grant number 17511103403, 2017]; The funder has no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Conflict of Interest Statement The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. Acknowledgments We acknowledge the ex...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: BLADDER CANCER: Edited by Siamak Daneshmand Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Immunotherapy Managing your health care Source Type: blogs
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