Contribution of antimicrobials to the development of allergic disease.

Contribution of antimicrobials to the development of allergic disease. Curr Opin Immunol. 2019 Jun 08;60:91-95 Authors: Anderson SE, Weatherly L, Shane HL Abstract Antimicrobials represent a broad class of chemicals with the intended purpose of eliminating or controlling the growth of harmful microorganisms. Exposure can occur occupationally or through the use or consumption of consumer products. The use of antimicrobial agents has been associated with an increased incidence of allergic diseases, including asthma, atopic dermatitis, and less commonly, anaphylaxis. Very diverse immunological mechanisms and mediators have been identified in the sensitization response to antimicrobial chemicals and the importance of the local microenviroment in the response is increasingly being recognized. A complete understanding of the mechanisms of allergic diseases resulting from antimicrobial exposure will help to ensure safe environments and exposure limits. PMID: 31185370 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Opinion in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Immunol Source Type: research

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This article provides highlights of the clinically impactful original studies and reviews published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice in 2019 on the subjects of anaphylaxis, asthma, dermatitis, drug allergy, food allergy, immunodeficiency, immunotherapy, rhinitis/sinusitis, and urticaria/angioedema/mast cell disorders. Within each topic, practical aspects of diagnosis and management are emphasized. Treatments discussed include lifestyle modifications, allergen avoidance therapy, positive and negative effects of pharmacologic therapy, and various forms of immunologic and desensitization manageme...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Peanut allergy (PA) affects ∼1.6 million US children. The current standard of care is strict avoidance and prompt reaction treatment. PA healthcare costs and healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To estimate PA healthcare costs and HCRU using a nationally representative commercial payer database. METHODS: The IBM MarketScan ® Commercial Claims and Encounters Database was examined for PA diagnosis/reaction codes between January 2011 and October 2015 in patients ≤64 years, with age cohort-matched controls. Outcomes were measured 12 months b...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the clinical manifestations and risk factors for anaphylaxis in PFAS in Korean patients with pollinosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were obtained from a nationwide cross-sectional study that previously reported on PFAS in Korean patients with pollinosis. Data from 273 patients with PFAS were collected, including demographics, list of culprit fruits and vegetables, and clinical manifestations of food allergy. We analyzed 27 anaphylaxis patients and compared them with patients with PFAS with oropharyngeal symptoms only (n=130). RESULTS: The most common cause of anaphylaxis in PFAS wa...
Source: Yonsei Medical Journal - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Yonsei Med J Source Type: research
Although atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with increased risk of food allergy (FA), this association is not fully understood, and the predictors of severe reactions to foods are not clear. In a review of 18 population-controlled studies, the rate of food sensitization was up to 6 times higher in patients with AD vs healthy controls.1 A recent study identified a potential physiologic mechanism by demonstrating increased skin barrier dysfunction, measured by increased transepidermal water loss and reduced skin filaggrin levels, in patients with AD and FA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
PMID: 31520770 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Although atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with increased risk of food allergy (FA), this association is not fully understood and the predictors of severe FA are not clear. In a review of 18 population-controlled studies, the rate of food sensitization was up to 6 times higher in patients with AD versus normal controls.1 A recent study identified a potential physiologic mechanism by demonstrating increased skin barrier dysfunction, measured by increased transepidermal water loss and reduced skin filaggrin levels, in patients with AD and FA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Sean P. Saunders1, Erica G. M. Ma1,2, Carlos J. Aranda1 and Maria A. Curotto de Lafaille1,3* 1Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Laboratory of Allergy and Inflammation, Department of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, United States 2Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY, United States 3Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States The long-term effectiveness of antibody responses relies on the development of humoral immune memory. Humoral immunity is maintained by long-lived plasma ce...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Progestogen hypersensitivity (PH; a.k.a autoimmune progesterone dermatitis) was first reported 50 years ago in a woman whose symptoms correlated with the luteal phase of her menstrual cycle.1 Of note, her symptoms were partially resolved with estrogen administration. Since this case, PH cases manifesting as a spectrum of dermatologic eruptions in the presence or absence of anaphylactic symptoms have been reported. The classic presentation of PH symptoms is an onset beginning during the second half of the cycle when progesterone levels begin to increase.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: In conclusion, our report shows that cooked onion can induce severe allergic reactions, suggesting the presence of thermostable components. Moreover, we applied for the first time a B-cell-based approach to the diagnosis of food allergy. This latter approach might also be applied to other allergic conditions. PMID: 30858787 [PubMed]
Source: Advances in Dermatology and Allergology - Category: Dermatology Tags: Postepy Dermatol Alergol Source Type: research
Abstract The type 2 immune response is critical for host defense against large parasites such as helminths. On the other hand, dysregulation of the type 2 immune response may cause immunopathological conditions, including asthma, atopic dermatitis, rhinitis, and anaphylaxis. Thus, a balanced type 2 immune response must be achieved to mount effective protection against invading pathogens while avoiding immunopathology. The classical model of type 2 immunity mainly involves the differentiation of type 2 T helper (Th2) cells and the production of distinct type 2 cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL...
Source: Cellular and Molecular Immunology - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Cell Mol Immunol Source Type: research
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