Going To Bed Late Can Increase Negative Thinking And Worry

Skimping on sleep by staying up late could indicate you're headed for a negative spiral of persistent worry and anxious thinking the next day, according to new research from Binghamton University. The researchers asked 100 students to complete several questionnaires and two computerized tasks to gauge repetitive negative thinking (RNT) by measuring how much the subjects worried, ruminated or obsessed over something. The subjects also answered questions about their sleep habits and schedules. Subjects who described themselves as "evening" people, as well as those who slept fewer hours at night, were found to experience more negative thoughts than those who described themselves as "morning" people, as well as those who slept longer. Though the data suggests a correlation, it does not imply causality. The researchers note that it is possible that worry leads to disruptions in the timing and duration of sleep, rather than late sleep times causing greater worry. The new data supports previous research, which has linked repetitive negative thinking with sleeping issues, but is the first to suggest a link between RNT levels and sleep schedule. However, a 2013 study published in the Journal of Occupational Psychology found a correlation between late bed times and depressive symptoms. Repetitive, intrusive negative thoughts like those described by the students who stayed up late are often associated with depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 22 March 2019Source: Journal of Psychiatric ResearchAuthor(s): Harold A. Sackeim, Scott T. Aaronson, Mark T. Bunker, Charles R. Conway, Mark A. Demitrack, Mark S. George, Joan Prudic, Michael E. Thase, A. John RushiAbstractThere is considerable diversity in how treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is defined. However, every definition incorporates the concept that patients with TRD have not benefited sufficiently from one or more adequate trials of antidepressant treatment. This review examines the issues fundamental to the systematic evaluation of antidepressant treatment adequacy and re...
Source: Journal of Psychiatric Research - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
The objective of the study is to test a refined measure of attitudes about aging as a multidimensional construct reflective of a relational process that includes personal identity (i.e., beliefs about oneself), social identity (i.e., self-conception based on group membership), and collective identity (i.e., self-conception based on comparison of groups) as well as capturing awareness of ageism and its impact. Researchers refined the Aging Anxiety Scale and recruited a convenience sample of 329 participants via a social media platform. A principal component factor analysis revealed the specification of three latent factors:...
Source: International Journal of Aging and Human Development - Category: Geriatrics Tags: Int J Aging Hum Dev Source Type: research
Conclusion. The audio-digital recording method provides a useful second opinion that can affirm the need for a different treatment intervention in these anxious patients. A second live assessment would have required additional clinic time and added patient burden. The audio-digital recording method is less burdensome than live second opinion assessments and might have utility in both research and clinical practice settings. Keywords: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), anxiolytic medications, anxious symptoms, audio-digital recording, dual review, second opinions Anxiety symptoms are prevalent in most populations wher...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Original Research anxiolytic medications anxious symptoms audio-digital recording dual review Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) second opinions Source Type: research
Conclusion TBI is a distinct and complex pathophysiological entity. Neurocognitive deficits and mood disorders are common sequelae of TBI. While nonmodifiable factors influence risk of developing post-TBI depression, there is also evidence that biological factors are involved. People who have suffered TBI are at increased risk for ictal events and cognitive impairment. ECT has been documented to successfully treat patients with post-TBI mood symptoms in only three published cases. While these vignettes suggest that ECT might be a safe and effective therapeutic option in treating individuals with post-TBI depression, more r...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Hot Topics in Neuroscience depression ECT Electroconvulsive therapy mood disorders TBI traumatic brain injury treatments Source Type: research
We describe their treatment and review the current literature on the use of ECT among patients with PD. CASE SERIES All six patients in our retrospective chart review received bitemporal modified brief pulse ECT. Prior to ECT, the patients underwent pre-ECT evaluation, which involved hemogram analysis, renal and liver function tests, fasting blood glucose analysis, chest X-ray (posteroanterior view), and serum electrolyte analysis, all of which were within the normal range for all six patients, and none of the patients showed evidence of raised intracranial pressure on fundoscopy examination. All patients provided written ...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Case Review Current Issue Depression Devices ECT Mental Disorders Mood Disorders Movement Disorders Neurology Parkinson's disease Psychiatry Technology Electroconvulsive therapy parkinson’s disease Source Type: research
Recent research published in the November 2017 issue of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity suggests that a woman’s immune response in the brain may decrease during pregnancy and the postpartum period. These findings, discussed by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, might help to establish a connection between the brain’s immune function and the anxiety and mood disorders that are common throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period. Previous research has shown that during pregnancy, the response of the body’s peripheral immune system (the part of our protective system that does not protect the brain)...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research Women's Issues Bipolar Depression fetal development immune changes Immune Function Immunity immunosuppression Mania miscarriage Moth Source Type: blogs
Everyone ruminates. We especially ruminate when we’re stressed out. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming test—you have to score an A to keep your scholarship. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming presentation because you want to impress your boss. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming date and the many ways it could go. Maybe you’re ruminating about a bad performance review. Maybe you’re ruminating about an injury that’s really been bothering you. “We are evolutionarily wired to obsess,” according to psychiatrist Britton Arey, M.D. We are wired to se...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Anxiety Binge Eating Bulimia Depression Disorders Eating Disorders General Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Panic Disorder Psychology Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorders Distressing Thoughts Mindfulness Negative Thinki Source Type: news
Discussion School within society is an institution designed to provide learning opportunities to students under the direction of teachers. The curriculum is usually designed to provide academic content in formal subjects necessary for the adult world (such as instruction in mathematics, language, science, social studies, arts, physical education) but also other knowledge and skills for the adult world (i.e. personal safety, communication skills, working in teams, etc.). Specific schools may or may not offer specific courses of instruction such as religious education, learning disability education, gifted/talented education...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
When I was pregnant back in 1997, I wish my doctor had told me I might be at risk for postpartum depression. Her words wouldn’t have alarmed me. They would have prompted me to get treatment when the darkness did indeed hit. During my six-week postpartum checkup when I was at my worst, I wish my OB/GYN had handed me a mental health screening and explained the difference between the “blues” and depression. Perhaps I would have lied on the screening, although I doubt it. At the time I was desperately trapped inside my terrified silence. Only my husband knew how far I’d fallen until one night on the ph...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Disorders General Health-related Parenting Personal Psychology Women's Issues Baby Blues Childbirth Hormonal Changes Mental Disorder Motherhood Obstetrics postpartum depression Pregnancy Source Type: blogs
In January, when attention focused on the need for postpartum depression screening because of a recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel of physicians and epidemiologists that develops recommendations for clinical preventive services, I was both relieved and concerned. As a women’s health advocate and educator I worried that screening could contribute to further pathologizing women’s experiences, especially when they are connected to their reproductive lives. I also feared that Big Pharma wanted to cash in, and that fetal effects from antidepressant medication might be und...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Childbirth Women's Health Postpartum depression United States Preventive Services Task Force Source Type: blogs
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