Mental illness affects a fifth of people living in war zones

One in five people in war zones has depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, the World Health Organization said on Tuesday, with many suffering severe forms of these mental illnesses.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 12 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Fiona Charlson, Mark van Ommeren, Abraham Flaxman, Joseph Cornett, Harvey Whiteford, Shekhar SaxenaSummaryBackgroundExisting WHO estimates of the prevalence of mental disorders in emergency settings are more than a decade old and do not reflect modern methods to gather existing data and derive estimates. We sought to update WHO estimates for the prevalence of mental disorders in conflict-affected settings and calculate the burden per 1000 population.MethodsIn this systematic review and meta-analysis, we updated a previous systematic review by searc...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Common problems include depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, according to the World Health Organization. About 9% have a moderate to severe mental health condition.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 -- About 22% of people who live in conflict areas suffer from mental health problems, a new study review finds. Common problems include depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia,...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
One in five people living in an area affected by conflict has a mental health condition such as depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, the World Health Organization says.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
What Are 5 Underlying Reasons for Addiction? Addiction always stems from a root cause, also known as one of the reasons for addiction. It is extremely important to treat both the root cause of the addiction in addition to the physical addiction itself. Staying sober involves much more than just detoxing from drugs or alcohol and abstaining from them in the future. It also involves finding the underlying reasons for the addiction and treating that as well, so that it does not exacerbate the addiction in the future. This is why so many people fail when they attempt to quit using drugs or alcohol cold turkey. While there can ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Abuse Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcohol Alcoholism Anxiety Children Depression Depression Treatment Drug Treatment LGBT LGBTQ Mental Health Painkiller Source Type: blogs
It’s hard working as a college professor with bipolar disorder. I suppose it’s hard working anywhere with bipolar disorder, but my particular vocation is teaching 18-year-olds how to write at a local university. I’ve had bipolar illness for almost 30 years now; I was diagnosed in 1991. I’m 56. I’ve been at my university for about as long as I’ve been bipolar. Why is it so hard to be a bipolar teacher in the higher education system?  The main reason is the stigma of the disease. As you probably know, even in 2019, there is horrible stigma about bipolar illness. There is sympathy for ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar College Personal Stigma Bipolar Disorder Depression Depressive Episode Manic Episode Teaching Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsSocial interactions are the most complex and ambiguous environments human beings place themselves in. Many explicit and implicit “rules” govern what is considered appropriate and what can be expected from any one interaction. Consequently, they are settings rife for miscommunication and misunderstanding. It requires intricate examination to determine exactly what the rewarding components of social interactions are. Social interactions are highly dynamic, complex circumstances that seem more inclined to produce anxiety than lead to rewards given their ambiguities. For those with social anhedonia, whos...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
 Most of us are familiar with post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD (deservedly) gets a lot of attention, largely focused on soldiers returning from service. But trauma comes in many forms, and most people have experienced it in one form or another. In this episode, learn about the differences between PTSD and other forms of trauma, how to identify it, and what can be done about it.   Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Robert T. Muller, Ph.D., is the author of the psychotherapy book, “Trauma &the Struggle to Open Up:  From Avoidance to Recovery &a...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General PTSD The Psych Central Show Trauma Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Although a cause–effect relationship cannot be firmly stated, an association between early trauma experience and cognitive impairment such as visual memory, as well as a relationship between negative symptoms and attention domains, is suggested by our preliminary findings. Future studies with larger sample sizes and prospective design will clarify the long-term effects of early exposure to trauma and its clinical meaning in terms of developing psychotic-related illness.IntroductionMore than 75% of patients with schizophrenia show some level of cognitive impairment, leading to poor functional status and im...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Does Prenatal Stress Shape Postnatal Resilience? – An Epigenome-Wide Study on Violence and Mental Health in Humans Fernanda Serpeloni1,2, Karl M. Radtke1,3, Tobias Hecker4, Johanna Sill1, Vanja Vukojevic5, Simone G. de Assis2, Maggie Schauer1, Thomas Elbert1 and Daniel Nätt6* 1Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology, Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany 2Department of Studies in Violence and Health Jorge Careli, National School of Public Health of Rio de Janeiro – National Institute of Women, Children and Adolescents Health Fernandes Figueira, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, ...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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