Mystery of why arteries harden may have been solved, say scientists

Study finds calcium deposits are triggered by molecule produced by damaged cellsThe mysterious mechanism behind the hardening of arteries may have been solved, researchers have revealed, in a study that also suggests the first potential preventive drug for the condition linked to heart attack, dementia and stroke.Arteries harden as calcium becomes deposited in the elastic walls of the vessels, a process that happens as we age and is exacerbated for patients with diabetes or kidney disease. Stiffening can also occur as calcium becomes deposited in fatty plaques in the arteries – a condition called atherosclerosis.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Medical research Science Heart attack Society Dementia Stroke UK news Source Type: news

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In this study, the most common reason that patients or their doctors stopped statins was the development of advanced cancer or other major illness. In my practice, I have also cared for many patients who have stopped taking statins or who express reluctance to take statins due to side effects. The most common side effect is muscle ache (typically tenderness or soreness of the large muscle groups, such as the biceps and thighs), which affects about 20% of statin takers and reverses when the statin is discontinued. There is also a slightly increased risk of diabetes with long-term statin use and, very rarely, liver problems....
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Healthy Aging Heart Health Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Researchers and advocates have been trying for some years to launch the TAME trial to assess the effects of metformin on aging in humans. This is not with the hope of producing meaningful effects on the progression of aging. Metformin has a small effect size, being one of the less effective interventions that upregulates cellular stress responses, a strategy that in and of itself is weak in long-lived species such as our own. The goal is to push the FDA into accepting clinical trials that target mechanisms of aging rather than a specific named age-related condition. Metformin was chosen because its safety profile, widespre...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionThis nationwide population ‐based study revealed that ADT was not associated with cerebral infarction after adjusting for potential confounders.
Source: Cancer Medicine - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
Looking for clues about the health of your brain? You might want to pay a visit to your eye doctor. Research increasingly links common eye conditions — glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy — to risk for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. What’s interesting about the study results, says Dr. Albert Hofman, chair of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is that cataracts, another common age-related eye condition, had no apparent connection to dementia risk. This gives scientists an important clue about the cause of dementia and Alzheimer&rs...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Eye Health Source Type: blogs
Ischaemic stroke and myocardial infarction risk more than tripled after two pregnancies with pre-eclampsia Related items fromOnMedica GPs failing to follow women at risk after gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes raises long-term CVD risk Early periods linked to heightened cardiovascular risk Pre-eclampsia linked to raised risk of vascular dementia Parity lower in women with unfavourable lipid profile
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
A, Lima LM Abstract Various forms of vascular injury are frequently associated with type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Macro-angiopathy has alarming signs and symptoms such as those seen with stroke or heart attack, however the presentation of small vessel disease is generally more subtle and therefore usually unnoticed for a long period of time. While it may affect any organ, complications involving the nervous system such as diabetic poly-neuropathy (DPN) are especially debilitating, and it may also be a risk factor for other brain disorders such as dementia. The underlying mechanisms are likely to be multi-facete...
Source: Brain Research Bulletin - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Res Bull Source Type: research
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