Heart Transplantation for Hepatitis C Virus Non-Viremic Recipients From Hepatitis C Virus Viremic Donors

Multiple strategies have been implemented to increase the donor pool to avoid transplant wait-list mortality. The approval of highly effective direct-acting antiviral regimens for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has enabled expansion of the donor pool by allowing the transplantation of organs from HCV-viremic donors to HCV-negative recipients. Multiple centers have recently published data on outcomes of heart transplantation from HCV-viremic heart donors to HCV-negative recipients, with acceptable posttransplant outcomes. However, areas of uncertainty remain, particularly in the long-term risks of intentional HCV transmission, as well as the possibility that sustained virologic response may not be achieved. In this article, we review the literature illustrating both the risks and benefits of transplantation of organs from HCV-viremic donors to HCV-negative recipients. We also present the data collected at our institution regarding this special patient population.
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

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Organ transplantation is undergoing profound changes. Contraindications for donation have been revised in order to better meet the organ demand. The use of lower-quality organs and organs with greater preoperative damage, including those from donation after cardiac death (DCD), has become an established routine but increases the risk of graft malfunction. This risk is further aggravated by ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) in the process of transplantation. These circumstances demand a preservation technology that ameliorates IRI and allows for assessment of viability and function prior to transplantation. Oxygenated h...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Donor-derived hepatitis C (dd-HCV) infection may increase the risk of renal impairment (RI) among heart transplantation (HT) recipients. Sofosbuvir, an integral component of HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has also been linked to RI. To date, no study has examined the trends in renal function for HT recipients of dd-HCV infection and assessed safety and efficacy of Sofosbuvir-based DAAs. Between September 2016 and June 2018, 46 HCV-naive patients and one patient with a history of HCV treated pretransplant, underwent HT from HCV-positive donors (follow-up available through October 10, 2018). Patients were treated with L...
Source: ASAIO Journal - Category: Medical Devices Tags: Clinical Cardiovascular Source Type: research
We describe our experience with immediate post-transplant use of GLE/PIB in relation to sustained virologic response (SVR) based on route of administration.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (211) Source Type: research
Since the highly effective Direct-Acting Antiviral (DAA) therapies have been available for treatment of HCV, transplant centers have begun using organs from HCV infected donors followed by treatment with DAAs. Epidemiological studies have shown that HCV may be associated with an increase atherosclerosis and it has been hypothesized that this is caused by activation of an immunological or inflammatory response. HCV infection of endothelial cells may promote endothelial dysfunction and early atherogenesis.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (742) Source Type: research
We present the first described case of DAA treatment failure in a patient who received an HCV donor, nucleic acid testing (NAT) positive heart.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (19) Source Type: research
Hepatitis C (HCV) organs have been increasingly utilized in solid organ transplantation since the advent of curative direct acting anti-viral (DAA) therapy. Despite the adoption of this strategy, many unanswered questions remain regarding the management of immunosuppression. In two small case series of liver transplant recipients, tacrolimus concentrations have been shown to decrease with clearance of HCV viremia. We seek to describe our experience and clinical implications in our cardiac transplant population.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (397) Source Type: research
We report the incidence of CAV in heart transplant recipients from HCV viremic donors (nucleic amplification test positive; NAT+) compared to non-HCV infected donors (NAT-).
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (274) Source Type: research
Passive transmission of hepatitis C (HCV) viremia from actively infected donors to uninfected recipients at the time of heart transplantation may modulate response to alloantigens and risk of allograft rejection. We evaluated the one-year incidence of acute cellular rejection (ACR) in patients transplanted from nucleic amplification testing positive (NAT+) HCV donors compared to those from NAT negative (NAT-) donors.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (273) Source Type: research
Thoracic organ transplantation from Hepatitis C (HCV) viremic donors is a promising strategy due to curative therapies for HCV. Currently, there is no consensus on the best time to initiate HCV therapy relative to time of transplantation. We assessed the difference in magnitude of viremia and time to clearance in recipients of heart (HT) and lung (LT) transplant, based on timing of starting antiviral HCV therapy.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (272) Source Type: research
This study is an updated analysis of outcomes after HCV+ heart transplantation in the United States.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (271) Source Type: research
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