Trauma Informed Care: How CBT & Mindful Awareness Are Key Factors in Repairing the Brain

We’ve come a long way since therapists prescribed to their clients to punch their pillows when angry as a cathartic way to release negative emotions. While it helped bring up the emotion, they left out a critical piece in recovery: connecting that emotion to the logical side of our brains. What the person felt was not relief but disassociation. What we know today in neuroscience and psychotherapy research is that when a traumatic event occurs, the brain goes into dysregulation. That is, the body and the mind become disconnected. Our survival or emotional part of our brain kicks in and calls the shots while our logical or thinking part goes silent. It’s an acute physical reality just like when someone might get their shoulder disconnected in a sports accident. The person who experienced trauma is said to be stuck in “trauma time” and may also be emotionally reactionary when something triggers them, which is called a “trauma response.” When a person continues to feel trauma, the brain stays in a disassociated state until they are able to re-integrate the two parts of the brain again. Sometimes this can take years… as with chronic stress or continually being in unsafe situations including financial insecurity, and domestic abuse or neglect. When a person is finally safe, physically speaking, the work of re-integration can take place. Very often, a person still feels unsafe when they are physically safe because their somatic experience...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: PTSD Trauma Treatment Disassociation Emotional Dysregulation Resilience Trauma Informed care trauma recovery Validation Source Type: blogs

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Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology syndication Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Policy and Advocacy Relationships The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Disorders General Research Treatment cannabidiol Cannabis cbd cbd oil Marijuana THC Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Mental Health and Wellness Stress Treatment Biofeedback stress reduction Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Creativity Grief and Loss Peer Support Self-Help Bipolar Disorder bipolar mania Depressive Episode Manic Episode Source Type: blogs
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