Gluteomorphin: The opiate in your food

Yes: there are opiates that derive from various food proteins that exert peculiar effects on the human brain. The worst? The opiates that come from the gliadin protein of wheat and related grains. Opiate receptor researchers at the National Institutes of Health originally coined the term “gluteomorphin” nearly 40 years ago when it was determined that the gliadin protein of wheat undergoes partial digestion (since humans lack the digestive enzymes to fully digest proline-rich amino acid sequences in proteins from seeds of grasses) to yield peptides that are 4- to 5-amino acids long. Some of these peptides were found to bind to the opiate receptors of the brain, thereby exerting opiate-like, or opioid, effects, thus the term gluteomorphin (also sometimes called gliadorphin). This research was performed in response to several observations made in people with paranoid schizophrenia who, upon removal of all gluten sources (that contain gliadin) experienced a reduction of paranoid thinking and auditory hallucinations. Dr. F. Curtis Dohan, while participating in field research in New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Micronesia, also made the observation that non-grain consuming natives of these islands developed an explosive level of schizophrenia when allowed to consume Western foods containing grains. Several subsequent studies were performed linking gliadin-derived opioids with schizophrenic behavior but, as often happens in nutritional research, interest waned, as m...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Opioids addictive binge eating bulimia eating disorders Gliadin opiates wheat belly Source Type: blogs