Prevalence and diversity of avian blood parasites in a resident northern passerine

Climate-related changes are expected to influence the prevalence and distribution of vector-borne haemosporidian parasites at northern latitudes, although baseline information about resident birds is still lac...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research

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Abstract Despite extensive research on the sensory and cognitive processes of host rejection of avian brood parasites' eggs, the underlying perceptual and cognitive mechanisms are not sufficiently understood. Historically, most studies of host egg discrimination assumed that hosts rejected a parasite's egg from their nest based on the perceived color and pattern differences between the parasite's egg and their own. A recent study used a continuous range of parasitic egg colors and discovered that hosts were more likely to reject browner foreign eggs than foreign eggs that were more blue green, even when their abso...
Source: The American Naturalist - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Am Nat Source Type: research
ute;M Abstract Avian malaria is a widespread infection caused by parasites from the Order Haemosporida. Indeed, Neotropical swifts are interesting models for host-parasite coevolution studies due to their unique life history that may allow them to escape parasitism. Considering this, we evaluated haemosporidians from Neotropical swifts. We collected blood and prepared smears from 277 individuals from waterfalls in Brazil. Despite low parasitemia or absence of parasites detected by microscopy haemosporidian infection was detected in 44 swifts (15.8%) using a screening PCR that amplifies a 154-nucleotide segment of ...
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
Haemosporidian parasites are transmitted by dipteran blood-sucking insects but certain vectors remain unidentified for the great majority of described species. Sensitive PCR-based methods are often used for th...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Short report Source Type: research
This study combined PCR-based and microscopic approaches and reported cytochrome b gene (cytb) and apicoplast gene (clpc) markers for characterization of six widespread species of haemoproteids parasitizing common birds wintering in tropics and subtropics of the Old World. Three new Haemoproteus species were described using morphological and molecular markers. Molecular characterization of haemoproteids parasitizing falcons was developed. Morphological and phylogenetic characterization of Haemoproteus tinnunculi (cytb lineage hFALSUB01), H. brachiatus (hLK03), H. parabelopolskyi (hSYAT1), H. homogeneae n. sp. (hSYAT16), H....
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
sch S Abstract Avian haemosporidian parasites are particularly diverse and widespread. To date, more than 3,000 distinct cytochrome b lineages have been recorded, of which some present extremely wide geographical distributions, even including multiple continents. Whether these isolates represent one or several cryptic species remains unknown. Here we carried out a case study of SISKIN1, a common haemosporidian parasite lineage belonging to the morphologically described species Haemoproteus tartakovskyi. To shed light on its evolutionary origin, we investigated the divergence between SISKIN1 isolates obtained from ...
Source: The Journal of Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: J Parasitol Source Type: research
NH, Weckstein JD Abstract Birds harbor a diverse group of haemosporidian parasites that reproduce and develop in the host blood cells, muscle tissue, and various organs, which can cause negative effects on the survival and reproduction of their avian hosts. Characterization of the diversity, distribution, host specificity, prevalence patterns, and phylogenetic relationships of these parasites is critical to the study of avian host-parasite ecology and evolution and for understanding and preventing epidemics in wild bird populations. Here, we tested whether muscle and liver samples collected as part of standard or...
Source: The Journal of Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: J Parasitol Source Type: research
This study aimed to determine SPN (spinosyn A + spinosyn D) and ABM residues in egg and edible tissues of laying hens following spray application. A total of 36 laying hens were divided into four groups of nine animals each, and they were kept in individual cages. Two different concentrations of SPN (2 and 4 g/L) and ABM (0.025 and 0.033 g/L) were applied in stocked and empty cages, respectively. Eggs were collected individually for 30 days. All hens were sacrificed at day 30 post-treatment, and tissue samples (liver, breast muscle, fat and skin) were collected. The residue levels in eggs and tissues were...
Source: Avian Pathology - Category: Pathology Authors: Tags: Avian Pathol Source Type: research
ABSTRACTMosquito vectors play a crucial role in the distribution of avianPlasmodium parasites worldwide. At northern latitudes, where climate warming is most pronounced, there are questions about possible changes in the abundance and distribution ofPlasmodium parasites, their vectors, and their impacts to avian hosts. To better understand the transmission ofPlasmodium among local birds and to gather baseline data on potential vectors, we sampled a total of 3,909 mosquitoes from three locations in south ‐central Alaska during the summer of 2016. We screened mosquitoes for the presence ofPlasmodium parasites using molecula...
Source: Journal of Vector Ecology - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Avian malaria parasites (genus Plasmodium) are cosmopolitan and some species cause severe pathologies or even mortality in birds, yet their virulence remains fragmentally investigated. Understanding mechanisms an...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
y FM, Nisbet AJ Abstract Dermanyssus gallinae, the poultry red mite, is a global threat to the commercial egg-laying industry. Control of D. gallinae is difficult, with only a limited number of effective pesticides and non-chemical treatments available. Here we characterise the candidate vaccine antigen D. gallinae cathepsin D-1 (Dg-CatD-1) and demonstrate that purified refolded recombinant Dg-Cat-D1 (rDg-CatD-1) is an active aspartyl proteinase which digests haemoglobin with a pH optimum of pH 4. Soluble protein extracts from D. gallinae also have haemoglobinase activity, with a pH optimum comparable to the recom...
Source: Avian Pathology - Category: Pathology Authors: Tags: Avian Pathol Source Type: research
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