Viability of using a computer tablet to monitor an upper limb home exercise program in stroke.

Conclusion: Monitoring of patient practice using a tablet computer is feasible and may prove more reliable than self-report. There is variability in the amount of upper limb exercise stroke patients do at home. PMID: 31172867 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Physiother Theory Pract Source Type: research

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Among the new rehabilitation strategies aimed at improving independent walking after stroke, the body weight-support training allows an early and controlled ambulatory training. To date, most available studies are based on treadmill body weight-support (BWS) training and involve patients with chronic stroke sequelae. In contrast, the effects of a BWS training performed on the ground in patients with subacute hemiparesis (stroke within 4 weeks), with significant gait deficiencies, is unknown. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a rehabilitative program that combines conventional approach with an ea...
Source: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
There is increasing interest in gait training devices to improve walking ability in people following stroke. This randomised controlled trial aimed to compare the effectiveness of the Robowalk, a novel cable-driven gait trainer combined with conventional physiotherapy to conventional physiotherapy alone in improving walking speed, endurance, balance, functional outcomes, and quality of life in people following stroke. Rehabilitation inpatients within 3 months following stroke (n = 40) were randomised to standard care with conventional physiotherapy (‘control,’ n = 20) and cable-driven gait trainer combined with...
Source: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Condition:   Stroke Interventions:   Other: Physiotherapy including Vestibular rehabilitation;   Other: conventional Physiotherapy Sponsor:   Prof. Dan Justo Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conclusion: This study opens the way for future researchers, psychologists, physiotherapist and other practitioners to do more extensive work in the domain of virtual reality with different sample, constructs and approaches.Implications for rehabilitationIt has become increasing important to introduce new state-to-art technologies in domain of rehabilitation.People are reluctant to use all the traditional modes of treatment. As these conventional ways of treatment are least motivating and interesting to indulge the patients without force and burden. It is evident in the present study that addition of virtual reality-based ...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation. Assistive Technology. - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol Source Type: research
Conclusion: Despite of the heterogeneity of the included studies, evidence was found demonstrating that SBI can induce biomechanical changes in motor behavior during walking in stroke patients. No conclusions could be formulated regarding reaching tasks. Additionally, directions for future research for understanding the underlying mechanism of the clinical improvements after SBI are: (1) using actual music pieces instead of rhythmic sound sequences and (2) examining sub-acute stroke rather than chronic stroke patients.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract Background: Stroke causes multi-joint gait deficits, so a major objective of post-stroke rehabilitation is to regain normal gait function. Design and Setting: A case series completed at a neuroscience institute. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine the concurrent impact of functional electrical stimulation (FES) during treadmill walking on gait speed, knee extensors spasticity and ankle plantar flexors spasticity in post-stroke survivors. Participants: Six post-stroke survivors with altered gait patterns and ankle plantar flexors spasticity (4 = male; age 56.8 ± 4.8 years; Body Mass Index (BM...
Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Physiother Theory Pract Source Type: research
A paraplegic man made the first kick of the World Cup in Brazil in 2014; another paralyzed man was able to move all four of his limbs through mind-control, and yet another could walk down the aisle with the love of his life due to robotic structures called exoskeletons. These are just a few mind-blowing and heart-warming stories about their current power, but they haven’t reached their full potential yet. We looked around what exoskeleton technology can do today and what it promises for tomorrow. Exoskeleton becomes as real as a donut Remember the huge mechanic beasts fighting against the indigenous people on m...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Robotics digital health exoskeleton science fiction technology exoskeletons rehabilitation paralyzed stroke injury spinal cord exoskeleton technology Source Type: blogs
Does adapted cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improve the physical behaviours of people with mild-to-moderate stroke in the sub-acute recovery phase using a compositional data analysis (CoDA) approach?
Source: Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Source Type: research
Discussion: After 8 months of intensive rehabilitation, he demonstrated substantial improvements in all functional mobility and recovery of sensation. Rehabilitation included interventions such as electrical stimulation, fluidotherapy, repetitive task training, and most significantly, external augmented feedback. This feedback included sensory cues, auditory and tactile cues, and maximizing the use of vestibular input. This case demonstrates that neurorehabilitation can benefit patients with impaired use of sensory cues and central integration. PMID: 31657267 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Physiother Theory Pract Source Type: research
Abstract Intermittent claudication is a symptom of atherosclerosis of the lower limbs (peripheral arterial disease (PAD)) and is characterized by pain and cramps of lower limb muscles during exercise. Claudication leads to a reduction in physical activity of patients. PAD is a systemic disease. Atherosclerotic lesions located in the arteries of the lower limbs not only pose the risk of the ischemic limb loss, but above all, they are an important prognostic factor. Patients with claudication are at significant risk of cardiovascular complications such as infarcts or strokes. Comprehensive rehabilitation of patients...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
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