The Guardian view on African swine fever: bad for people as well as pigs | Editorial

The current outbreak, linked to smallholders, is likely to affect prices around the world. But supersized animal farms are not the answerIn the coming weeks, bacon sandwich eaters in Newcastle and dairy farmers in California may find their pockets hit by developments thousands of miles away. The culprit is an outbreak ofAfrican swine fever which is sweeping through Asia, leading to the culling of millions of pigs in China and Vietnam, in what one expert calls the world ’s biggest animal disease outbreak to date. The US and the UK are watching keenly. Denmark hasbuilt a 43-mile border fence to keep out wild boar. The devastating impact in Asia and the consequences already being felt further afield shed light on the globalisation of modern food production.The highly infectious disease is harmless to humans but fatal to pigs; there is, as yet, no vaccine. It was first detected outside Africa in 1957, in Portugal. It re-emerged in Europe more recently. But never before has it spread so rapidly and damagingly. In China, which until this outbreak reared around half the world ’s pigs, every province has been affected. The disease has already shown up in Mongolia, Cambodia and North Korea. The UN Food And Agriculture Organization says it believes the cases reported by governments are underestimates. Many farmers may quietly sell infected meat rather than relying on prom ises of compensation and enmeshing themselves in disease-control obligations. Officials may also be rel...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Farming Agriculture The meat industry China Vietnam Mongolia Cambodia North Korea Asia Pacific Science Environment World news Food Food science Globalisation Source Type: news

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Computational vaccinology includes epitope mapping, antigen selection, and immunogen design using computational tools. Tools that facilitate the in silico prediction of immune response to biothreats, emerging infectious diseases, and cancers can accelerate the design of novel and next generation vaccines and their delivery to the clinic. Over the past 20 years, vaccinologists, bioinformatics experts, and advanced programmers based in Providence, Rhode Island, USA have advanced the development of an integrated toolkit for vaccine design called iVAX, that is secure and user-accessible by internet. This integrated set of immu...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Human trials will begin imminently – but even if they go well and a cure is found, there are many barriers before global immunisation is feasibleCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEven at their most effective – and draconian – containment strategies have only slowed the spread of the respiratory disease Covid-19. With the World Health Organization finally declaring a pandemic, all eyes have turned to the prospect of a vaccine, because only a vaccine can prevent people from getting sick.About 35 companies and academic institutions are racing to create such a vaccine, at least...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science Microbiology World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Source Type: news
Human trials will begin imminently – but even if they go well and a cure is found, there are many barriers before global immunisation is feasibleCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEven at their most effective – and draconian – containment strategies have only slowed the spread of the respiratory disease Covid-19. With the World Health Organization finally declaring a pandemic, all eyes have turned to the prospect of a vaccine, because only a vaccine can prevent people from getting sick.About 35 companies and academic institutions are racing to create such a vaccine, at least...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Society Source Type: news
Last year, when I visited the town of Beni, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), people did not shake hands. Bottles of disinfectant and buckets of chlorinated water were at the entrance of every business. Misinformation spread across social networks and on news-sites, and treatment centers in the northeastern province of North Kivu were being attacked by armed militias. At the time, Beni was one of the centers of a devastating Ebola outbreak, the second most deadly in world history. According to the World Health Organization, almost 3,500 people were sickened by the virus, and more than 2,000 died, a case fatali...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Human trials will begin imminently – but even if they go well and a cure is found, there are many barriers before global immunisation is feasibleCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEven at their most effective – and draconian – containment strategies have only slowed the spread of the respiratory disease Covid-19. With the World Health Organization finally declaring a pandemic, all eyes have turned to the prospect of a vaccine, because only a vaccine can prevent people from getting sick.About 35 companies and academic institutions are racing to create such a vaccine, at least...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Society Source Type: news
Around the world, more than 40 teams are working on a vaccine for Covid-19. We followed one doctor in the most urgent quest of his life. By Samanth SubramanianCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageOf the dozens of places where a coronavirus vaccine might be born, one is DIOSynVax, a small company started by a Canadian pathologist named Jonathan Heeney. In ordinary times, I ’d have visited Heeney in his office, in a stately red-brick building in Cambridge. I’d have met his team and his Aria III cytometer, which looks like as if might brew a strong, space-age espresso but which, in fac...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Source Type: news
Human trials will begin imminently – but even if they go well, there are many hurdles before global immunisation is feasibleCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEven at their most effective – and draconian – containment strategies have only slowed the spread of the respiratory disease Covid-19. With the World Health Organization finally declaring a pandemic, all eyes have turned to the prospect of a vaccine, because only a vaccine can prevent people from getting sick.About 35 companies and academic institutions are racing to create such a vaccine, at least four of which alread...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Society Source Type: news
Covid-19 essential guide: how is it different from the seasonal flu, can you pick it up from public transport and how sick will I get?Coronavirus – latest updatesWhat are the coronavirus symptoms?The Covid-19 virus is a member of the coronavirus family that made the jump from animals to humans late last year. Many of those initially infected either worked or frequently shopped in the Huanan seafood wholesale market in the centre of the Chinese city of Wuhan. Unusually for a virus that has made the jump from one species to another, it appears to transmit effectively in humans – current estimates show that withou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Health Microbiology Medical research Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Society Source Type: news
Abstract On the 17th of October 2019, a workshop was held at Wageningen Bioveterinary Research in Lelystad, the Netherlands, to discuss the obstacles to vaccination in the veterinary field. Participants from academia, OIE, FAO, EC, EMA, USDA, national regulatory and veterinary health authorities, and the animal health industry discussed how availability and access to animal vaccines can be improved not just in the EU and US but also in Low to Middle Income Countries (LMIC) across the world and agreed that this requires innovations in both the scientific and the regulatory field. The workshop called for engaging al...
Source: Biologicals : Journal of the International Association of Biological Standardization - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Biologicals Source Type: research
Human trials will begin imminently – but even if they go well and a cure is found, there are many barriers before global immunisation is feasibleCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEven at their most effective – and draconian – containment strategies have only slowed the spread of the respiratory disease Covid-19. With the World Health Organization finally declaring a pandemic, all eyes have turned to the prospect of a vaccine, because only a vaccine can prevent people from getting sick.About 35 companies and academic institutions are racing to create such a vaccine, at least...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Health Medical research Microbiology Science World news Society Source Type: news
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