Study: More sleep may reduce heart disease risk

Sleeping longer may help people who don't get enough rest avoid cardiometabolic risks like heart disease and metabolic disorders, a new study says.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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The battery-powered device is designed to help people with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Untreated OSA is linked to a higher risk of conditions such as heart disease and stroke.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
By Emma Young If you ever daydream about retirement, what do you picture? Lie-ins, instead of being woken by an alarm? Walks on a beach, in place of the morning commute? More time for beloved hobbies? Or perhaps endless open, solitary days, with nothing much to do…? Retirement is what psychologists term a “major life transition”. As such, it’s regarded as a stressor that carries risks as well as potential rewards. Now that the number of retirees in many countries is soaring, so too is the number of studies into whether retirement is good for your mental and physical health — or not. This...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Feature Health Mental health Source Type: blogs
I keep hearing radio ads about high-tech cleaners for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines, which are used to treat sleep apnea. Bacteria and mold can accumulate in different parts of the device. Just the touch of a button, say the ads, and all undesirable organisms lurking in the CPAP pump, tube, and mask will be zapped into oblivion. Your CPAP system will be sanitized and ready for use while you sleep. But can a CPAP system really lead to illness? And if so, do we need space-age technology to clean a CPAP machine? Wait: What is a CPAP system and why is one needed? A CPAP machine is one of the best treatmen...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Health Infectious diseases Sleep Source Type: blogs
Fitbit or Apple Watch for running? Garmin or Misfit for swimming? Sleep Cycle or Sleep as Android for sleep tracking? What about measuring heart rate, blood pressure, or tracking how to cut out stress from your life? Dozens of gadgets on the healthcare wearable market promise you a healthier lifestyle, but it’s easy to go astray in the jungle of digital health gadgets. Let me show you my top choices when it comes to health wearables and trackers. Guidance in the health wearable universe By now, I have tested and used more than a hundred devices and gadgets that measure health parameters or vital signs. Thus,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics activity fitness fitness trackers Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation meditation mental health Personalized medicine sleep sleep optimization sleep tracking stress technology wear Source Type: blogs
FRIDAY, Oct. 4, 2019 -- Middle-aged adults with high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, or stroke could be at higher risk for cancer and early death when sleeping less than six hours per day, according to a study published online Oct. 2...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
A new study from Pennsylvania State College of Medicine has found that adults with heart disease who don't get enough sleep triple their risk of dying from cancer.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Americans aren’t sleeping well. Roughly 80% of U.S. adults say they struggle to fall asleep at least one night a week, according to a recent Consumer Reports survey. And research has found that sleep problems are also on the rise among adolescents. While the causes of America’s sleep woes are up for debate, there’s little disagreement about America’s favorite remedy: Melatonin, by far the country’s most-used sleep aid. What is Melatonin? Melatonin is a hormone that plants and animals, including humans, produce naturally. The melatonin sold in over-the-counter pills is synthetic, but chemically...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized anti-oxidants drug safety inflammation medicine melatonin Source Type: news
In conclusion, older adults exhibited decreased markers of UPR activation and reduced coordination with autophagy and SC-associated gene transcripts following a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise. In contrast, young adults demonstrated strong coordination between UPR genes and key regulatory gene transcripts associated with autophagy and SC differentiation in skeletal muscle post-exercise. Taken together, the present findings suggest a potential age-related impairment in the post-exercise transcriptional response that supports activation of the UPR and coordination with other exercise responsive pathways (i.e....
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Sleeping in late on a Saturday sounds delicious, right? However, as with many delicious things, there may be a cost to your health and waistline. Catching up on sleep on the weekend can almost feel like the norm these days. With increasingly full schedules and competing demands, sleep is often sacrificed during the busy workweek. As the week comes to an end, many people look to the less structured weekend to cram in what couldn’t be done during the week, including sleep. In sleep clinic, I now ask “When do you get up on work (or school) days?” and “What about bedtime and wakeup time on days off?&rdq...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Fatigue Sleep Source Type: blogs
Discussion Pulmonary embolism (PE) is potentially life-threatening but fortunately rare event especially in the pediatric population. It was first described in children in 1861. PE is likely underreported because of minimal or non-specific clinical symptoms. The incidence is estimated at 0.05-4.2% with the 4.2% based on autopsy reports. It is probably also increasing as more central venous catheters (CVC) are used, and more children are surviving previously poor prognostic diseases. There is a bimodal distribution with cases
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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