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We appreciate the commentary from Michaud et al, particularly for pointing out the French vaccine guidelines ’ recommendations for measles-mumps-rubella, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, pneumococcal, influenza, and hepatitis A vaccines. In our article,1 we primarily relied on the recommendations by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)2 and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA ) guidelines,3 which are mostly in agreement with the French guidelines. We agree with Michaud et al that strengthening the patient-doctor relationship and emphasizing the importance of physicians offering vaccines are important public health goals, even if the outcome is incomplete immunization at times, because any level of protection is definitely better than no protection.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research

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We appreciate the commentary from Michaud et al, particularly for pointing out the French vaccine guidelines ’ recommendations for measles-mumps-rubella, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, pneumococcal, influenza, and hepatitis A vaccines. In our article,1 we primarily relied on the recommendations by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)2 and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA ) guidelines,3 which are mostly in agreement with the French guidelines. We agree with Michaud et al that strengthening the patient-doctor relationship and emphasizing the importance of physicians offering vaccines a...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research
Mark K. Slifka1* and Ian J. Amanna2 1Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, Beaverton, OR, United States2Najít Technologies, Inc., Beaverton, OR, United States Vaccines play a vital role in protecting our communities against infectious disease. Unfortunately, some vaccines provide only partial protection or in some cases vaccine-mediated immunity may wane rapidly, resulting in either increased susceptibility to that disease or a requirement for more booster vaccinations in order to maintain immunity above a protective level. The durability of a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Discussion Vaccines are a mainstay of infectious disease prevention and health promotion. Infants, children and adults benefit from vaccines the most when they are given on the recommended schedules. However there are times when this is not possible as children come to the physician a little early, or a little late, or had unavailable records and so received addition vaccine, etc. There are many questions that arise because of these timing issues such as the one above. Standard vaccine schedules can be reviewed here. Commonly administered vaccines includes: Live-attenuated vaccines Cholera Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Date: May 7, 2018 Issue #:  1546Summary:  The US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine use of the following vaccines in adults residing in the US: influenza, tetanus/diphtheria alone (Td) and in combination with acellular pertussis (Tdap), measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), varicella (VAR), herpes zoster (RZV; ZVL), human papillomavirus (HPV), and pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide (PPSV23) vaccines. For adults with certain medical conditions or occupational, behavioral, or other risk factors, hepatitis A (HepA), hepatitis B (HepB), meningococcal (MenAC...
Source: The Medical Letter - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: ActHIB Avaxim Bexsero Boostrix Cervarix diphtheria Engerix-B Gardasil Gardasil9 Genital warts Haemophilus infuenzae Havrix hepatitis a hepatitis b Heplisav-B Hiberix HPV vaccine Influenza vaccine measles Menactra Me Source Type: research
Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been developed. In the second golden age, the cell culture technology enabled polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines be dev...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
Conclusion: There are variations in vaccination practice across Europe. Children with CKD, those undergoing dialysis, and transplant candidates should receive age-appropriate vaccinations before RTx as well as before the transition to adult nephrology clinics and antibody levels should be monitored to evaluate the immunization status before and after RTx.Nephron
Source: Nephron - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Imagine there was a simple treatment that could be given to babies and toddlers that was not only remarkably effective in preventing illness, but also inexpensive. And imagine that this treatment was not only inexpensive, but also lowered overall health care costs. There’s no need to imagine; the treatment exists. It’s called immunization. It’s National Infant Immunization Week, a time to recognize and celebrate immunization. It’s during infancy that we give the most vaccines, but the benefits extend far beyond infancy and beyond those babies. The protection lasts for ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Health policy Infectious diseases Managing your health care Parenting Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
The adolescent period heralds the pediatric patient’s transition into adulthood. It is a time of dynamic development during which effective preventive care measures can promote safe behaviors and the development of lifelong health habits. One of the foundations of preventive adolescent health care is timely vaccination, and every visit can be viewed as an opportunity to update and complete an adolescent’s immunizations. In the past decade, the adolescent immunization schedule has expanded to include 2 doses of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, 1 dose of tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis, abso...
Source: PEDIATRICS - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Infectious Disease, Vaccine/Immunization From the American Academy of Pediatrics Source Type: research
Anti-infectious human vaccination in historical perspective. Int Rev Immunol. 2015 Nov 25;:1-32 Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been deve...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
Abstract Recommendations for routine vaccinations in children and adolescents have changed multiple times in recent years, based on findings in clinical trials, licensure of new vaccines, and evidence of waning immunity. Despite the overwhelming success of vaccinations, vaccine delay and refusal are leading to pockets of vaccine-preventable diseases. Schedules for diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis (DTaP); hepatitis A and B; Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib); inactivated poliovirus; varicella; and measles, mumps, and rubella are unchanged. However, since 2008, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugat...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
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