Mycosis fungoides: A great imitator

Mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, typically presents in its early stage as inflammatory erythematous patches or plaques, with epidermotropism as the histopathologic hallmark of the disease. Over the past 30 years, numerous atypical types of MF, which deviate from the classic Alibert-Bazin presentation of the disease, have been described. These variants can simulate a wide variety of benign inflammatory skin disorders either clinically, both clinically and histopathologically, or mainly histopathologically.
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research

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Revisiting the initial diagnosis and blood staging of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome with the KIR3DL2 marker. Br J Dermatol. 2019 Sep 05;: Authors: Roelens M, de Masson A, Ram-Wolff C, Maki G, Cayuela JM, Marie-Cardine A, Bensussan A, Toubert A, Bagot M, Moins-Teisserenc H Abstract BACKGROUND: The early diagnosis of Sézary syndrome is challenging. Loss of CD7 and CD26 expression on CD4 T cells is currently used criteria in the initial diagnosis and staging of Sézary patients. OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to evaluate the respective value of CD26, CD7 and KIR3DL2 expression ...
Source: The British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Br J Dermatol Source Type: research
Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) comprise a relatively rare group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by neoplastic infiltration of the skin [1]. Mycosis Fungoides (MF) is the most common CTCL accounting for nearly 55% of cases whereas S ézary syndrome (SS) is less commonly seen [2]. Clinical presentation of CTCL is heterogeneous and prognosis is dependent on the particular subtype and the stage of diagnosis [3].
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
Mycosis fungoides cutaneous-type T-cell lymphoma (MF-CTCL) is a rare non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In patients with early stage MF-CTCL, topical chlormethine (=mechlorethamine) 0.016% w/w gel (equivalent to 0.02% chlormethine HCl) was reported safe and effective, but usage may be limited due to the development of contact dermatitis. The primary endpoint of the current study was to determine if Triamcinolone significantly reduces the development of chlormethine-induced contact dermatitis using the newly formulated 0.016% w/w gel.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Adaptive Immunity and Autoimmunity Source Type: research
In vitro studies have indicated that staphylococcal enterotoxin-producing bacteria promote activation of STAT3 in malignant cutaneous lymphoma (Sezary syndrome) T cells. We investigated the skin microbiome of patch stage mycosis fungoides (MF) compared to normal skin by 16S amplicon sequencing and whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS). Swab specimens were taken from MF patches and contralateral healthy appearing skin of 20 patients. The most common genera were Staphylococcus (30,0 %), Corynebacterium (22,3 %) Propionibacterium (5,0 %) and Streptococcus (3,0 %).
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity and Inflammation Source Type: research
Clinical and laboratory diagnostics of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous lymphoma is challenging. Our previous work described 4 promising markers of S ézary syndrome (SS): T-plastin, Twist, NKp46 and KIR3DL2 (Michel et al. 2013). Tox has been shown to be an additional marker for MF and SS. The aim of the present study was to confirm this combination of blood-derived markers in a validation cohort of SS, erythodermic and earlier MF for improving d iagnosis and predicting prognosis. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of MF or SS and patients with other skin diseases were included.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Source Type: research
In this report, we present a case of CD30+ transformed MF and discuss the clues that allow us to make the challenging distinction between transformed MF and other CD30+ CTCLs. We review histologic and clinical features of these different disorders, with a focus on the revised World Health Organization classification of primary cutaneous lymphomas.
Source: Pathology Case Reviews - Category: Pathology Tags: Case Reviews Source Type: research
Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, which confers significant mortality in advanced stage disease (Suzuki et al. 2010; Vollmer 2014). Although stage-specific survival data are available from different cohorts, there have been no attempts to combine existing overall survival (OS) data in this disease (Suzuki et al. 2010). Moreover, the hitherto published OS data are presented as Kaplan-Meier curves and mortality risks which are of limited utility for the patients, who prefer to have an estimate of their chances of survival (Kiely et al.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
Background: Mycosis fungoides is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, a relatively rare form of lymphoma. Although there are many treatment modalities that have shown clinical improvement in disease severity, no studies have analyzed if a controlled form ofbathing and moisturizing, ie, “gentle skin care” would aid in that improvement.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Introduction: Mycosis fungoides bullosa (MFB) is an uncommon clinical presentation of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Clinically, it presents with tense bullae simulating bullous pemphigoid. Herein, we describe a case of MFB mimicking Stevens –Johnson Syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: Mycosis fungoides (MF) and S ézary syndrome (SS) are cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) in which erythroderma can occur. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) prevalence is increased in CTCL patients and contributes to CTCL disease flare. Our aim was to further define patient and S. aureus factors associated with response to antib iotic treatment in erythrodermic CTCL patients.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
More News: Cutaneous T cell lymphoma | Dermatology | Lymphoma | Mycosis Fungoides | Skin | T-cell Lymphoma