AHA News: Torn Heart Artery Put Young Mom on Verge of Death

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- As Jara Herron walked down her hallway to feed her 10-day-old baby, she didn't feel right. She was nauseous. Her chest felt like elephants were sitting on it. Then Herron tried to pick up...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Related Links:

Abstract Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy specific disorder that can be life threatening for both mother and baby. It is characterized by new onset hypertension during the second half of pregnancy and affects approximately 300,000 women in the United States every year. There is no cure for PE and the only effective treatment is delivery of the placenta and the fetus, which is often preterm. PE is believed to be a severe manifestation of placental dysfunction due to early angiogenic imbalances and inflammatory disturbances; however, the cause of this is unknown. The once thought "sterile" placenta now has...
Source: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol Source Type: research
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Americans spent $1.4 billion on the most popular brands of children’s fruit drinks and flavored waters last year. Yet according to nutritional guidelines, none of the drinks were healthy. Why would loving parents do this? Perhaps because US beverage companies spent $20.7 million to advertise fun, fruity drinks with added sugars to families in 2018, according to Children’s Drink Facts 2019, a new report from the University of Connecticut’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. “I know that parents want their children to be healthy, but the sweetened drink market is just incredibly co...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN juice Source Type: news
Credit: Busani Bafana/IPSBy Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi NsoforILLINOIS, United States / ABUJA, Oct 16 2019 (IPS) United Nations World Food Day is celebrated around the world on October 16 under the theme: “Our Actions ARE Our Future. Healthy Diets for a Zero Hunger World”. This theme is timely, especially, because across Africa and around the world, there has been a gradual rise in malnutrition and diet-related non communicable diseases, as highlighted in The Lancet study and a United Nations Report published earlier this year. While 45 percent of deaths in children are from nu...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health World Food Day Source Type: news
Delayed cord clamping improves health of babies born too early: updated Cochrane ReviewThis updated Cochrane systematic review   finds that delayed, rather than early, cord clamping may reduce the risk of death before discharge for babies born preterm.The authors set out to determine if delayed cord clamping or umbilical cord milking improves the health outcomes for babies born before 37 weeks'gestation. These interventions were compared with early cord clamping.Babies born before 37 weeks, or preterm, have poorer health outcomes than babies born at term, particularly if they are born before 32 weeks. They can experie...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
We examined the misclassification of documented intrapartum stillbirth and factors associated with misclassification.Material and methodsA prospective observational study was performed in 12 public hospitals in Nepal. Data was extracted from the medical records of all births that occurred during six ‐month period of the study. For the study purpose, we classified birth outcome based on the presence of fetal heart sound (FHS) at admission and use of neonatal resuscitation. The health worker documented Intrapartum stillbirths were considered potentially misclassified when there were FHS present at admission and no resuscit...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
A recent study that claimed men who drank while trying to conceive with their partners were at greater risk of children with heart disease turns out to have been based on presumptions not science.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This month, Kayla and Lance Edwards welcomed their daughter Indy Pearl Edwards into the world, and became the fourth couple to have a child through the uterus transplant program at Baylor Scott &White Health’s Baylor University Medical Center. The couple would have had a great love story even without those extraordinary circumstances. They attended elementary school together in Vancouver, Wash., lost touch, and then reconnected through social media more than a decade later. After months of chatting through the game “Words with Friends,” they finally went on a date in January 2013 and got engaged about...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study medicine Source Type: news
By Emma Young If you ever daydream about retirement, what do you picture? Lie-ins, instead of being woken by an alarm? Walks on a beach, in place of the morning commute? More time for beloved hobbies? Or perhaps endless open, solitary days, with nothing much to do…? Retirement is what psychologists term a “major life transition”. As such, it’s regarded as a stressor that carries risks as well as potential rewards. Now that the number of retirees in many countries is soaring, so too is the number of studies into whether retirement is good for your mental and physical health — or not. This...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Feature Health Mental health Source Type: blogs
(Reuters Health) - Fathers who drink alcohol in the months just before their child is conceived are more likely to have a baby with heart defects than those who abstain prior to conception, a recent study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
More News: Babies | Babies Heart Conditions | Cardiology | General Medicine | Heart