"Choose Physical Therapy" for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Clinical Management for Infants Affected by the Opioid Crisis.

"Choose Physical Therapy" for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Clinical Management for Infants Affected by the Opioid Crisis. Phys Ther. 2019 Jun 01;99(6):771-785 Authors: McCarty DB, Peat JR, O'Donnell S, Graham E, Malcolm WF Abstract In response to the opioid crisis, the American Physical Therapy Association has strongly advocated for physical therapy as a safe alternative to pharmacological pain management through the "#ChoosePT" campaign and the dedication of a PTJ special issue to the nonpharmacological management of pain. Physical therapists not only play an important role in the rehabilitation of the nearly 2 million adolescents and adults addicted to prescription opioids but also provide care to infants born to mothers with various drug addictions. This Perspective article explores the incidence, pathophysiology, and risk factors for neonatal abstinence syndrome and describes the clinical presentations of withdrawal and neurotoxicity in infants. Discipline-specific recommendations for the physical therapist examination and plan of care, including pharmacological management considerations, are outlined. Nonpharmacological management, including supportive care, feeding, parent education, social aspects of care, and follow-up services, are discussed from a physical therapy perspective. Finally, this article reviews developmental outcomes in infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome and reflects on challenges and future directions of...
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Phys Ther Source Type: research

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You're reading Options to Opioids: How to Manage Chronic Pain Without Prescribing Pain-Killers, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. While there is considerable debate as to how much blame doctors should be assigned for the ongoing opioid crisis, there is little doubt they can do something to curtail it -- that instead of prescribing drugs that have been found to be highly addictive they can resort to alternate forms of pain management. Doctors’ prescription of powerful painkillers like OxyContin is frequ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: health and fitness addiction health and wellness opioids self improvement Source Type: blogs
If you are one of the more than 100 million Americans suffering with chronic pain, you know how desperate you can get searching for relief. For constant or chronic pain, sometimes knowing that you can only get temporary relief from medications sits at the back of your brain and sets up pain anticipation. Shouldn’t there be a better way, an approach or approaches that don’t rely on pharmaceutical drugs to combat pain? According to new research, there are some new pain relief methods that look very promising to do just that. Treatment from Strangers Mat Provide Unexpected Pain Relief It may seem counter-intuitiv...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Research Treatment Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Chairman Burgess indicated that he is still deciding whether to combine numerous opioid-related bills into a single legislative package or try to move the bills through committee individually. Chairman Burgess noted that it is possible to put all of the legislation together in one package, but added that part of him “wants to consider them as individual bills so that, as we go through at least the subcommittee markup and the full committee markup, there will be ample opportunity for people’s ideas to be heard.”        
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
I never wanted to be a drug pusher. A career in medicine was the opposite — healing in place of harming. However, I knew something was wrong when a detective asked to speak to me about one of my patients. My patient, addicted to Vicodin, had committed several acts of fraud and theft in desperate attempt to satisfy her needs. Her arrest was the final step in a long, slow unraveling of a happy and productive life. I was not just a witness to this painful process; I was an active participant. As her primary care physician, I helped fuel her addiction and shared in the responsibility. When the history of the opiate epide...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Physician Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs
By JULIE KIM, MD I’m a pediatric oncologist, but cancer is not always the most serious problem my young patients face. Currently one of them, a 14-year-old boy, his mother, or both may be opioid addicts. I may be enabling their addiction. Tragically, their situation is not unique. Adolescent patients are at risk for addiction from opioid pain medications just as adult patients are. But pediatric patients are overlooked in this war against opioid addiction. No policies protect them or those caring for them. Usually pain is short-term, and only limited opioids are needed. Most providers, including those caring for chil...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Julie Kim Opioids Source Type: blogs
In the midst of an opioid addiction epidemic, a new survey of Americans has found that most prefer to try a non-drug approach to treating their pain over taking medications prescribed by their doctor. The new report, part of the Gallup-Palmer College of Chiropractic Annual Study of Americans, surveyed about 6,300 adults. Nearly two thirds said that they had neck or back pain so great they sought a health care provider for relief, and 54% said they had neck or back pain for at least five years. Yet 78% said they preferred to try other ways to address their physical pain before taking drugs. Still, many Americans said they ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Back Pain back pain relief chronic pain Gallup Heroin how to treat back pain how to treat pain natural pain relief Opioid opioids pain killers prescription pain killers Source Type: news
If you measure your daily step count or raise a virtual plant to drink more water a day, you already fell victim of the charms of gamification. Is it bad news? On the contrary! Gamified apps, devices, and therapies will gradually appear in every field of healthcare making behavior change easier and more fun. Here are the greatest examples of gamification! Why is it so hard to change? Sequin dresses, champagne and smiling faces counting down to the new year. Some kisses here and some resolutions there. This time, Samantha thought everything will be different. She made a resolution every year to change her lifestyle into som...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Mobile Health diabetes Education future games gamification gc3 Innovation Medicine Personalized medicine technology wearable wearables Source Type: blogs
There was plenty to blame: the car wreck that broke his back. The job pouring concrete that shattered his spine a second time. The way he tore up his insides with cigarettes, booze, cocaine, and opioids.It all amounted to this: Carl White was in pain. All the time. And nothing helped — not the multiple surgeries, nor the self-medication, not the wife and daughter who supported him and relied on him.Then White enrolled in a pain management clinic that taught him some of his physical torment was in his head — and he could train his brain to control it. It's a philosophy that dates back decades, to the 1970s o...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
Those of you who have experienced pain, especially gnawing, chronic pain, know that it affects your happiness, outlook and ability to function.In the past couple of years, the treatment of chronic pain has undergone an earthshaking transformation as opioid addiction continues to claim — and ruin — lives.Many primary care doctors no longer liberally prescribe opioid painkillers such as oxycodone, fentanyl and hydrocodone for back pain, migraines and other chronic conditions. Instead, they are increasingly turning to alternative medications and non-drug options such as acupuncture and physical therapy."Most ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
You may have heard of the phrase “primum non nocere” — the Latin phrase that doctors are supposed to follow that instructs them to “first, do no harm.” Doctors also have an important ethical obligation to alleviate pain. But what happens when these two mandates collide? That, unfortunately, is the case with opioid pain relievers: powerful medicines like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and hydromorphone. These medications are potent pain relievers, but this relief comes at a serious, and sometimes deadly, cost. The United States is now in the era of an “opioid epidemic” in which deaths from...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Drugs and Supplements Pain Management Source Type: blogs
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