The design and application of a bacterial ghost vaccine to evaluate immune response and defense against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli O2:K1 serotype

Publication date: Available online 4 June 2019Source: Research in Veterinary ScienceAuthor(s): Reza Hoseini Shahidi, Gholamreza Hashemi Tabar, Mohammad Reza Bassami, Abdollah Jamshidi, Hesam DehghaniAbstractAn Escherichia coli (E. coli) O2:K1 bacterial ghost was produced by controlled expression of bacteriophage PhiX 174 lysis gene E. Temperature controlled expression of this gene caused tunnels and holes in the cell wall of E. coli O2:K1 bacterium, leading to loss of cytoplasmic contents. Formation of E. coli O2:K1 ghost was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and determination of colony forming units. To evaluate the efficiency of this bacterial ghost vaccine to elicit cellular and humoral immune responses, 85 one day old chickens from Ross 308 breed were divided into the following 5 groups; group 1 (non-immunized control), group 2 (vaccine administered by injection of E. coli O2:K1 killed vaccine), group 3 (vaccine administered by injection of E. coli O2:K1 ghost), group 4 (vaccine administered by inhalation of E. coli O2:K1 ghost), and group 5 (neither immunized, nor challenged as negative control). The groups of 2, 3, and 4 were received vaccines at days 7, 14, and 22. Groups 1 to 4 were challenged with the wild type at day 33. Evaluation of post-mortem lesions and immune responses in all groups showed that chicken injected with the killed vaccine and the bacterial ghost had the best protection. These findings suggest that this bacterial ghost has the potential to ...
Source: Research in Veterinary Science - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

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Authors: Al-Mnaser AA, Woodward MJ Abstract In vitro studies aimed at studying the mechanism of action of carvacrol and oregano as natural anti-bacterial agents to control multiple antibiotic-resistant avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strain O23:H52 isolated from chicken were performed. Derivatives with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) to the phytochemicals were selected after growing Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain O23:H52 at sub-lethal concentrations of carvacrol and oregano for a period of 60 days. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of two derivatives revealed a missense mutation in cadC an...
Source: Polish Journal of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Pol J Microbiol Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of avian-origin mcr-1-harbouring Escherichia coli in Shandong Province, China. During 2017—2018, a total of 668 non-duplicate E. coli isolates were separately collected from 8eight large intensive poultry farms in Shandong Province. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for 10 antimicrobial agents commonly used in farms was performed on all E. coli isolates by the agar dilution method; the mobile colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) gene was screened by PCR, and mcr-1 positive isolates were PCR-screened for antimicrobial resistance genes and ty...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, our findings revealed that schizandrin could reduce the inflammatory injury of chicken type II pneumocytes by reducing the adhesion of APEC-O78 to chicken type II pneumocytes. The results indicate that schizandrin can be a potential agent to treat inflammation caused by avian colibacillosis. PMID: 32070918 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Immunopharmacology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Int Immunopharmacol Source Type: research
In conclusion, our findings reveal that schizandrin displays anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity against APEC-induced lung lesions in chickens, paving the way for rational use of schizandrin as a protective agent against lung-related inflammatory disease.
Source: Microbial Pathogenesis - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), are responsible for host diseases such as Neonatal Meningitis Escherichia coli (NMEC), the second-leading cause of neonatal bacterial meningitis, Avian Pathogenic E. co...
Source: BMC Research Notes - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Research note Source Type: research
Abstract Enteric illnesses remain the second largest source of communicable diseases worldwide, and wild birds are suspected sources for human infection. This has led to efforts to reduce pathogen spillover through deterrence of wildlife and removal of wildlife habitat, particularly within farming systems, which can compromise conservation efforts and the ecosystem services wild birds provide. Further, Salmonella spp. are a significant cause of avian mortality, leading to additional conservation concerns. Despite numerous studies of enteric bacteria in wild birds and policies to discourage birds from food systems,...
Source: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated whether heritable differences in colonization of inbred chicken lines by Campylobacter jejuni are associated with differences in caecal microbiota. We performed homologous and heterologous caecal microbiota transplants between line 61 (resistant) and line N (susceptible), by orally administering caecal contents collected from 3-week-old donors to day-of-hatch chicks. Recipient birds were challenged (day 21) with C. jejuni 11168H. In birds given homologous microbiota, the differential resistance of lines to C. jejuni colonization was reproduced. Contrary to our hypothesis, transfer of caecal m...
Source: Applied and Environmental Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Environ Microbiol Source Type: research
In conclusion, our findings indicated thatireA,0007,0008, and2235 indeed encode TBDRs, withireA having the most important role in iron uptake. These results should help future studies explore the mechanisms underlying the TonB-dependent iron uptake pathway.
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 January 2020Source: Microbial PathogenesisAuthor(s): Xiaohui Mu, Ruxia Gao, Wenhua Xiao, Qingqing Gao, Chunguang Cao, Huiqinq Xu, Song Gao, Xiufan LiuAbstractExtraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) shows an enhanced ability to cause infection outside the intestinal tract. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), one type of ExPEC, causes avian colibacillosis, a disease of significant economic importance to poultry producers worldwide that is characterized by systemic infection. Some ExPEC strains as well as other pathogenic enterobacteria produce enterobactin, a catecholate siderop...
Source: Microbial Pathogenesis - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
ithi Harris In sub-Saharan Africa, many families travel to collect water and store it in their homes for daily use, presenting an opportunity for the introduction of fecal contamination. One stored and one source water sample were each collected from 45 households in rural Kenya. All 90 samples were analyzed for fecal indicator bacteria (E. coli and enterococci) and species-specific contamination using molecular microbial source tracking assays. Human (HF183), avian (GFD), and ruminant (BacR) contamination were detected in 52, two, and four samples, respectively. Stored water samples had elevated enterococci concent...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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