Sleepless nights linked to high blood pressure

(University of Arizona) A bad night's sleep may result in a spike in blood pressure that night and the following day, according to new research led by the University of Arizona. The study, to be published in Psychosomatic Medicine, offers one possible explanation for why sleep problems have been shown to increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and even death from cardiovascular disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Conclusion: The results of our study may suggest the presence of FM as a clinical sign of a more severe migraine. However, the long-term prospective studies including these group of patients are needed to understand the prognostic impact and importance of the comorbid FM in migraine. Abbreviations: FM: Fibromyalgia; MIDAS: Migraine Disability Assessment. PMID: 31221031 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Neurological Research - Category: Neurology Tags: Neurol Res Source Type: research
Tens of thousands of Instagram followers can't be wrong: Curiosity about the sober life is trending. Scientists say cutting out alcohol can improve your sleep and blood pressure, and help your liver.(Image credit: Julia Robinson for NPR)
Source: NPR Health and Science - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
A bad night's sleep may result in a spike in blood pressure, offering a possible explanation for why sleep problems have been shown to increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and even death from cardiovascular disease.
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Our results link transportation noise exposure to development of obesity and suggest that combined exposure from different sources may be particularly harmful. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910 Received: 17 March 2017 Revised: 5 October 2017 Accepted: 9 October 2017 Published: 20 November 2017 Address correspondence to A. Pyko, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Telephone: 46(0) 852487561. Email: Andrei.pyko@ki.se Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910). The authors declare they have no actual or potential competing fina...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions:Insomnia disorder with short sleep is the most severe phenotype of insomnia and comorbid with many cardiometabolic and psychiatric illnesses, whereas morbidity profiles are highly similar between insomniacs with normal sleep duration and former insomniacs. Short sleep endemic to black Americans increases risk for the short sleep insomnia phenotype and likely contributes to racial disparities in cardiometabolic disease and psychiatric illness.Citation:Kalmbach DA, Pillai V, Arnedt JT, Drake CL. DSM-5 insomnia and short sleep: comorbidity landscape and racial disparities.SLEEP 2016;39(12):2101–2111.
Source: Sleep - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
By Brandon R. Peters, MD As my 81-year-old grandma likes to remind me on occasion, "It's hell to get old." More than a nuisance, the cumulative decline that comes with aging can significantly compromise one's quality of life and health. What if some of the problems so often associated with growing older didn't need to occur? Better yet, what if some of these physical and mental impairments could be reversed? Consider the role of sleep apnea as an unexpected contributor to many ailments erroneously attributed to aging and the reversals possible with effective treatment. Sleep Changes with Age It is clear that s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-3) criteria for OSAS specifies an AHI ≥5/h and ≥ one OSA symptom or associated medical/psychiatric disorder. A recent prevalence of 74.7% in men ≥40y suggests criteria are too inclusive (1). We determined the prevalence of ICSD-3 OSAS using a more conservative hypopnea definition (AASM 2005 alternate criteria) and a higher AHI cut-off of ≥10/h.Methods: Population- based study of men aged ≥40y in Adelaide, Australia (MAILES). Men with no prior OSA diagnosis (n=837) had full in-home polysomnography [mean age (SD): 61.0 (10.9); BMI: 28.6 (4.3)]. The prevalen...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: 4.2 Sleep and Control of Breathing Source Type: research
Authors: Kaczor M, Skalski M Abstract Insomnia presents an increasing and significant health issue in paediatric population. As the problem had grown over past decade, it became recognised by the specialists dealing with children and adolescents. In a recent study American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry members were asked about their experience with patients complaining about sleep disturbances. Doctors reported that sleep was a problem for 1/3 of their patients out of which 1/4 required pharmacotherapy [1]. Multiple studies concerning adults confirmed significance of healthy sleep in optimal cognitive,...
Source: Psychiatria Polska - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatr Pol Source Type: research
It's no secret that here at The Huffington Post, we love sleep -- and for good reason. Sleep has been called the "third pillar" of health, along with nutrition and exercise. Getting the quality sleep that you need has the power to protect your physical and mental health, while skipping out on sleep can seriously hurt your health, cognition and well-being over time. Over the past 10 years, sleep has finally become widely recognized as a critical aspect of good health, and new research has shed more light on its importance in our lives. Here's what we've learned. 1. A sleeping brain is an active brain. While...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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