Borderline personality disorder: from understanding ontological addiction to psychotherapeutic revolution

AbstractBypassing a reductionist view of existing diagnostic categories, ontological addiction theory (OAT) is a new psychological model of human functioning. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), defined as “a pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image and affects, and marked impulsivity”, is not only common (up to 20% of psychiatric inpatients), but also strongly associated with suicide attempts and death by suicide. Therefore, BPD constitutes a major public health concern. As a consequence of an underlying condition of ontological addiction, self-harming behaviors can be conceptualized as addictions, suicidal acts reflecting an experiential avoidance strategy against unbearable psychological pain. The present paper aims at: (1) understanding BPD daily life experiences from the perspective of OAT; (2) offering psychotherapeutic perspectives for this mental disorder. The diagnostic category of BDP may be understood as a simple label reflecting several extreme types of manifestations resulting from the Self-grasping ignorance that underpins ontological addiction. T herefore, development of psychotherapeutic interventions targeting ontological addiction appears to be a promising future direction.
Source: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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Authors: Ducasse D, Van Gordon W, Brand-Arpon V, Courtet P, Olié E Abstract Bypassing a reductionist view of existing diagnostic categories, ontological addiction theory (OAT) is a new psychological model of human functioning. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), defined as "a pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image and affects, and marked impulsivity", is not only common (up to 20% of psychiatric inpatients), but also strongly associated with suicide attempts and death by suicide. Therefore, BPD constitutes a major public health concern. As a consequence of an underlyin...
Source: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci Source Type: research
Conclusion It is clear that clinically, there is still much to be learnt about alexithymia and its relationship with a range of related phenomena. Firstly, is alexithymia a continuous and stable trait independent of psychological or somatic symptomology that is developed during childhood? Or is it instead a reactive state induced by trauma and distress at any age, which serves to defend against intense and upsetting emotions? This impacts on treatment options. For example, should we be focussing on early childhood interventions which target the child's emotional environment and parenting to encourage emotional exp...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study will be conducted in the city of Porto Alegre in the state of Rio Grande do Sul in far-southern Brazil. This region has Portuguese, Italian, German, and African influence. It has a population of 1.4 million, and it is the 10th most populous city in Brazil. Its ethnic distribution is as follows: White (79.2%), Black (10.2%), and Pardo (multiracial) people (10.6%). Its religious distribution is as follows: Catholic (83%), Protestant (9%), and others and atheists (8%). Brazil is a country with a high level of religiosity, and it is common for people to associate improvements in their health as being due to their fa...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) vs.Mindstrong HealthMood Monitoring via Invasive Brain Recordings or Smartphone SwipesWhich Would You Choose?That's not really a fair question. The ultimate goal of invasive recordings is one of direct intervention, by delivering targeted brain stimulation as a treatment. But first you have to establish a firm relationship between neural activity and mood. Well, um, smartphone swipes (the way you interact with your phone) aim to establish a firm relationship between your “digital phenotype” and your mood. And then refer you to an app for a precision intervention. Or to your t...
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
ConclusionEmotion dysregulation is an important and malleable treatment target with the potential to reduce or prevent opioid misuse and suicidality among opioid-treated chronic pain patients.
Source: Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In an article I wrote titled “Why I’m Grateful for My Son’s Self-Injury,” I describe my son’s depression and the use of cutting to release some of his inner pain. This self-injury turned into an addictive and compulsive act that culminated in several suicide attempts. Cutting became his demon; one that needed to be fed, demanded attention, and was in control. No longer was my son the master of himself, the demon was. He described it as a monster, an obsession, “I want to cradle my obsession and love my obsession. . .the monster that has festered for, it seems like an eternity, inside of ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Personal Self-Esteem Suicide Borderline Personality Disorder Coping Skills Cutting Major Depressive Disorder Mortification of the flesh Self Harm Suffering suicidal gestures Source Type: blogs
Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), developed by Marsha Linehan in the late 1980’s is a specific type of cognitive behavioral therapy that was originally developed to treat chronically suicidal individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD).  It is now considered the treatment of choice for individuals with characteristics associated with symptoms of BPD such as impulsivity, interpersonal problems, emotion dysregulation, self-harm, and chronic suicidal behaviors. Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is a type of cognitive therapy that focuses on the balance between acceptance and change. DBT works w...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Anxiety and Panic Borderline Personality Eating Disorders Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment Borderline Personality Disorder Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Dialectical Behavior Therapy Dialectical Behavioral Therapy emotion d Source Type: blogs
Over time, self-injury itself can become a habitual, nearly addictive behavior, and 8.7 percent of self-injurers are also addicts. Erin Hardy, a Wisconsin-based therapist, found herself in a quandary when an uptick of people who self-injured came to her about five years ago. This was a new area to her practice, so Hardy sought consultation with her colleagues on resources, but they came up empty. An internet search left Hardy with unsatisfactory results. “All the sudden I had this flood of individuals that were engaging in self-harm,” says Hardy. “There is really nothing [online] about self-harm other th...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Publishers The Fix Addiction Adults burning Coping skill Cutting Emotional Pain Erin Hardy hitting Renée Fabian Self Harm self-injure self-injury recovery Stigma Support Group Therapy Source Type: blogs
The prescription opioid crisis of overdosing and overprescribing has reached epic proportions, according to the North American media. Just last week, we learned that 91% of patients who survive opioid overdose are prescribed more opioids! The CDC calls it an epidemic, and notes there's been “a 200% increase in the rate of overdose deaths involving opioid pain relievers and heroin.” A recent paper in the Annual Review of Public Health labels it a “public health crisis” and proposes “interventions to address the epidemic of opioid addiction” (Kolodny et al., 2015).In the midst of this publ...
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
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