Science Just Moved A Step Closer To Making A'Stress Vaccine' From Bacteria Living Under Our Feet

Bacteria continues revealing secrets with major implications for our health. A new study homes in on a big one, possibly locating the missing piece for developing the long-theorized " stress vaccine " .
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 20 July 2019Source: Seminars in Cancer BiologyAuthor(s): Nancy A. Espinoza-Sánchez, Martin GötteAbstractOver the past few decades, understanding how tumor cells evade the immune system and their communication with their tumor microenvironment, has been the subject of intense investigation, with the aim of developing new cancer immunotherapies. The current therapies against cancer such as monoclonal antibodies against checkpoint inhibitors, adoptive T-cell transfer, cytokines, vaccines, and oncolytic viruses have managed to improve the clinical outcome of the patients. However,...
Source: Seminars in Cancer Biology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 July 2019Source: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and MedicineAuthor(s): Ashlynn L.Z. Lee, Chuan Yang, Shujun Gao, James L. Hedrick, Yi Yan YangAbstractProlonged vaccine release enables gradual immunostimulation, providing long-term immunity. Herein, Vitamin E- PEG-Vitamin E triblock ‘ABA’ hydrogel, which is formed through physical cross-linking of flower-shaped micelles and can reside in vivo for>17 weeks, was employed for delivery of cancer preventive vaccines to provide sustained anticancer immunity. Mice vaccinated with hydrogel formulations produced a sign...
Source: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine - Category: Nanotechnology Source Type: research
From the European Congress of Virology in Rotterdam, Vincent and local co-host Ben Berkhout speak with Ron Fouchier, Rosina Girones, and Marie-Paule Kieny about their careers and their work on influenza virus, environmental virology, and developing an Ebola virus vaccine during an epidemic. Hosts: Vincent Racanielloand Ben Berkhout Guests: Ron Fouchier, Rosina Girones, and Marie-Paule Kieny Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ECV2019 Drift of human H2N2 viruses (J Viral) Viruses in urban sewage (Sci Tot Environ) Ebola ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
CONCLUSIONS: Lessons from the successful delivery of maternal tetanus immunization in Malawi may be informative for similar countries considering new vaccines for pregnant women or striving to optimize the delivery of those currently provided. PMID: 31319932 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
PMID: 31319931 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
PMID: 31319930 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
[East African] Kenya this week kicked off a five-day national polio vaccination campaign in areas with greatest risk of transmission as the United Nations warned that outbreaks in some countries in the Horn of Africa threaten Africa's and global efforts to eradicate the disease.
Source: AllAfrica News: Polio - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 19 July 2019Source: Journal of Theoretical BiologyAuthor(s): Soyoung Kim, Eunok JungAbstractWe developed a mathematical model of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza epidemic in the Republic of Korea by considering five age groups and suggested the best way to prioritize an age-dependent vaccination strategy for mitigating the epidemic. An age-structured SEIAR influenza model was constructed based on the laboratory confirmed data obtained from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). The estimated transmission matrix captured one of the main characteristics of the 2009 A/H1N1 inf...
Source: Journal of Theoretical Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Authors: Ring N, Abrahams JS, Bagby S, Preston A, MacArthur I Abstract The evolution of Bordetella pertussis from a common ancestor similar to Bordetella bronchiseptica has occurred through large-scale gene loss, inactivation and rearrangements, largely driven by the spread of insertion sequence element repeats throughout the genome. B. pertussis is widely considered to be monomorphic, and recent evolution of the B. pertussis genome appears to, at least in part, be driven by vaccine-based selection. Given the recent global resurgence of whooping cough despite the wide-spread use of vaccination, a more thorough unde...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Authors: Stefanelli P Abstract Pertussis is a vaccine-preventable disease. Despite the high vaccination coverage among children, pertussis is considered a re-emerging disease for which identification, prevention and control strategies need to be improved. To control pertussis it is important to maintain a high vaccination coverage to protect the age groups considered at high risk for the disease. Laboratory confirmation of Bordetella pertussis infection together with a differential diagnostic test for other Bordetellae are prerequisite for a correct and timely diagnosis of pertussis. Moreover, investigations of ant...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
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