Short-term effectiveness of the flexion-distraction technique in comparison with high-velocity vertebral manipulation in patients suffering from low-back pain.

Short-term effectiveness of the flexion-distraction technique in comparison with high-velocity vertebral manipulation in patients suffering from low-back pain. Complement Ther Med. 2019 Jun;44:61-67 Authors: Carrasco-Martínez F, Ibáñez-Vera AJ, Martínez-Amat A, Hita-Contreras F, Lomas-Vega R Abstract OBJECTIVES: To determine the short-term effects of a modified Flexion-Distraction (FD) technique in comparison with a high-velocity low-back spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) protocol on patients suffering from chronic low-back pain (CLBP). DESIGN AND METHODS: A randomized controlled trial. The sample was composed of 150 patients suffering from CLBP, who were randomly assigned to either a FD (n = 75) or a HVLA-SM (n = 75) group. The variables used to study pain were the scores of the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) on trigger points (TrPs) of the quadratus lumborum. In addition, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to measure disability, and Schober's test and the Finger Floor Distance test (FFDT) to measure changes in low-back spine motion. An Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was used to measure group effect, and Number Needed to Treat (NNT) for effect size. RESULTS: Greater improvements occurred in the FD group, with a statistically significant group effect (p 
Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Med Source Type: research

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Abstract OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of Gua Sha therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: 50 patients with chronic low back pain (78% female, 49.7 ± 10.0 years) were randomized to two Gua Sha treatments (n = 25) or waitlist control (n = 25). Primary outcome was current pain intensity (100-mm visual analog scale); secondary outcome measures included function (Oswestry Disability Index), pain on movement (Pain on Movement Questionnaire), perceived change in health status, pressure pain threshold, mechanical detection threshold, and vibration detection threshold. RESULT...
Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Clin Pract Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The current study investigates the effects of an 8-week yoga program with educational intervention compared with an informational pamphlet on disability, anxiety, depression, and pain, in people affected by chronic low back pain (CLBP). METHODS: Thirty individuals (age 34.2 ± 4.52 yrs) with CLBP were randomly assigned into a Yoga Group (YG, n = 15) and a Pamphlet Group (PG, n = 15). The YG participated in an 8-week (2 days per week) yoga program which included education on spine anatomy/biomechanics and the management of CLBP. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Monitoring res...
Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Clin Pract Source Type: research
Authors: Bellido-Fernández L, Jiménez-Rejano JJ, Chillón-Martínez R, Gómez-Benítez MA, De-La-Casa-Almeida M, Rebollo-Salas M Abstract Background: There are a great number of interventions in physiotherapy, but with little evidence of their effectiveness in chronic low back pain. Therefore, this study assesses effectiveness of Massage Therapy and Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics and the combination of both to decrease pain and lumbar disability while increasing joint mobility and quality of life in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Methods: A randomized, ...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
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Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Clin Pract Source Type: research
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Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Clin Pract Source Type: research
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Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
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Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Med Source Type: research
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Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Med Source Type: research
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Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
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Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Behavioral Health Mental Health Stress Source Type: news
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