Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi in ticks and rodents in western Maryland

Journal of Vector Ecology, Volume 44, Issue 1, Page 201-204, June 2019.
Source: Journal of Vector Ecology - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Scientific Note Source Type: research

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This study assessed the prevalence of B. burgdorferi s. l. among four non-Peromyscus rodents in a prairie ecosystem in the Midwestern United States over a four-year period. We found high prevalences of the bacteria in all four species studied. Our results help to support the roles of Microtus species as reservoirs of B. burgdorferi and add to the literature that suggests Zapus hudsonius may also be a reservoir. Additionally, we identified a previously unknown possible reservoir, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. Our study also identifies the need to study the dynamics of Lyme borreliosis in habitats and areas outside of the typi...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Authors: Bulteel NS, Russell CD, Perry MR, Koch O Abstract The importance of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the human immune response to Borrelia burgdorferi is uncertain. Murine models suggest a critical role, including spirochaete reactivation following TNF-α inhibition. Our case, combined with a review of the clinical and scientific literature, provides reassurance that TNF-α inhibition can be safely reinstituted after treatment of disseminated borreliosis with standard duration antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID: 31188340 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh - Category: General Medicine Tags: J R Coll Physicians Edinb Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 June 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Kalvis Brangulis, Inara Akopjana, Ivars Petrovskis, Andris Kazaks, Kaspars TarsAbstractThe spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis – the most common tick-borne disease in Europe and the United States. Spirochetes are transmitted from infected Ixodes ticks to the mammalian host when the ticks feed. In general, the transfer process of the borreliae is quite complicated, as the environments in the tick and the new mammalian host differs significantly. Therefore, Borrelia changes th...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
The identification of microbial biomarkers is critical for the diagnosis of a disease early during infection. However, the identification of reliable biomarkers is often hampered by a low concentration of microbes or biomarkers within host fluids or tissues. We have outlined a multi-platform strategy to assess microbial biomarkers that can be consistently detected in host samples, using Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, as an example. Key aspects of the strategy include the selection of a macaque model of human disease, In vivo Microbial Antigen Discovery (InMAD), and proteomic methods that include...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 June 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Amira Nebbak, Handi Dahmana, Lionel Almeras, Didier Raoult, Nathalie Boulanger, Benoit Jaulhac, Oleg Mediannikov, Philippe ParolaAbstractFifty nymphal Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in Alsace, France, identified by morphological criteria and using MALDI-TOF MS, were tested by PCR to detect tick-associated bacteria and protozoan parasites. Seventy percent (35/50) of ticks contained at least one microorganism; 26% (9/35) contained two or more species. Several human pathogens were identified including Borrelia burgdorferi s.s. (4%), ...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
In this study, we identify an Ixodes scapularis salivary gland protein, Salp12, that is a chemoattractant for the spirochete. We demonstrate that Salp12 is expressed in the I. scapularis salivary glands and midgut and expression is not impacted by B. burgdorferi s.s. infection. Knockdown of Salp12 in the salivary glands or passive immunization against Salp12 reduces acquisition of the spirochete by ticks but acquisition is not completely prevented. Knockdown does not impact transmission of B. burgdorferi s.s. This work suggests a new role for chemotaxis in acquisition of the spirochete and suggests that recognition of Salp...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Tick selenoproteins are involved in regulating oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress during prolonged tick feeding on mammalian hosts. How selenoproteins are activated upon tick-borne pathogen infection i...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
oor Ticks are vectors of several pathogens that can be transmitted to humans and their geographic ranges are expanding. The exposure of ticks to new hosts in a rapidly changing environment is likely to further increase the prevalence and diversity of tick-borne diseases. Although ticks are known to transmit bacteria and viruses, most studies of tick-borne disease have focused upon Lyme disease, which is caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Until recently, ticks were considered as the vectors of a few viruses that can infect humans and animals, such as Powassan, Tick-Borne Encephalitis and Crimean–Co...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 June 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Benjamin A. Tonelli, Donald C. DearbornAbstractIxodes scapularis is responsible for the transmission of a variety of pathogens in North America, including Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti. Songbirds have previously been described as agents of tick dispersal, and a combination of empirical data and modeling efforts have implicated songbirds in the range expansion of I. scapularis northward into Canada during spring bird migration. The role of fall bird migration has received comparat...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
We present the case of an atypical papillitis, probably caused by this bacterium. We suspected this because of the results on the indirect test bloods and the improvement of the symptoms after treatment. This entity should be considered as a possible diagnosis of atypical optical neuropathies, particularly if it occurs in an endemic area. PMID: 31167569 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Eur J Ophthalmol Source Type: research
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