Contents

Publication date: June 2019Source: Anaesthesia &Intensive Care Medicine, Volume 20, Issue 6Author(s):
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research

Related Links:

It is 2 am. After working for 17 hours straight out of your 24 hour shift, you get a phone call from neurosurgery. We have a patient coming in from OSH that was just discharged, and she has a large cerebellar subdural. She is "kind of sick", you are warned. You collect as much information as you can from the neurosurgery resident and look up the pt on EMR (some minor identifying details altered) 28 y.o. 128 kg (BMI 52) - Unbalanced AV septal defect and TGA, pulmonic stenosis s/p fontan... Late night weekend case..
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Anesthesiology Source Type: forums
Hello I need some advice as I am at a crossing point in my career. I am currently a PMR pain and I joined an Anesthesia Pain private practice solo practicioner last year. He is getting older so he wants to meet with me and discuss a 2-3 year plan. Right now I have a straight base salary. We are EXTREMELY busy though we do about 20-30 procedures half day in his ASC as well as on clinic days we see about 30+ patients a day (which for me is draining and a lot). The thing I don't like is I... Negotiating new contract with boss
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
Source: FDA Drug Safety Podcasts - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: Anaesthesia Critical Care &Pain MedicineAuthor(s): Pierre-Yves Cordier, Matthieu Laurent, Eliott Gaudray, Éric Peytel, Julien Bordes
Source: Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: Anaesthesia Critical Care &Pain MedicineAuthor(s): Clément Derkenne, Olivier Bylicki, Romain Kedzierewicz, Antoine Lamblin, Daniel Jost
Source: Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Anesthesiology ClinicsAuthor(s): Kashif T. Khan, Kaveh Hemati, Anne L. Donovan
Source: Anesthesiology Clinics - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Anesthesiology ClinicsAuthor(s): Jennifer Anne Kaplan, Victoria Tang, Emily Finlayson
Source: Anesthesiology Clinics - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Anaesthesia &Intensive Care MedicineAuthor(s): Catherine Robinson, Lorna A. HowieAbstractPain in labour is often described as one of the most severe pains experienced. Neuraxial techniques provide the most effective form of labour analgesia. However, not all women wish to have this or indeed want complete pain relief in labour. There are also subgroups of women in whom neuraxial techniques are contraindicated or attempted placement is unsuccessful. Therefore delivery units must be able to offer a range of non-neuraxial analgesia options for labour.
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion, especially those with secondary scoliosis, are frequently unable to adequately perform pulmonary function tests. Among patients with interpretable pulmonary function tests, there was no association between results and postoperative intubation or intensive care unit admission. Routine pulmonary function testing for all patients with scoliosis may not be indicated for purposes of risk assessment before posterior spinal fusion. Clinicians should consider a targeted approach and limit pulmonary function tests to patients for whom results may guide preoperative optimizat...
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
Abstract The "What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia Lecture" is presented every year at the annual meeting of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology. This lecture was established in 1975 to update the membership on the most relevant articles that were published in the preceding calendar year. In 1995, the lecture was renamed as the "Ostheimer Lecture" in honor of Gerard W. Ostheimer, an obstetric anesthesiologist from the Brigham and Women's Hospital with significant contributions in the field. This review summarizes key articles published in 2017 that were presented in the 2018 Ost...
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
More News: Anesthesia | Anesthesiology | Intensive Care