Pain coping skills training for African Americans with osteoarthritis: results of a randomized controlled trial

African Americans bear a disproportionate burden of osteoarthritis (OA), but they have been underrepresented in trials of behavioral interventions for pain. This trial examined a culturally tailored pain coping skills training (CST) program, compared to a wait list control group, among 248 African Americans with knee or hip OA. The pain CST program involved 11 telephone-based sessions over 3 months. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3 months (primary), and 9 months, and included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale (primary outcome), WOMAC total score and function subscale, PROMIS Pain Interference, Short-Form 12 Mental and Physical Composite Subscales, Coping Strategies Questionnaire—Total Coping Attempts, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-8, Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale, and Patient Global Impression of Arthritis Symptom Change. Linear mixed models were fit for all outcomes. There were no significant between-group differences in WOMAC pain score at 3 months (−0.63 [95% confidence interval −1.45, 0.18]; P = 0.128) or 9 months (−0.84 [95% confidence interval −1.73, 0.06]; P = 0.068). Among secondary outcomes, at 3 months, there were significant differences, in favor of the CST group, for Coping Strategies Questionnaire Total Coping Attempts, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Arthritis Self-Efficacy, and Patient Global Impression of Arthritis Symptom Change (P
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research

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SUNDAY, Oct. 20, 2019 -- Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting about 31 million Americans, and is the leading cause of disability among adults. Known as OA, it causes pain and other symptoms in joints, which can affect the...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Authors: Pincus T, Castrejon I, Yazici Y, Gibson KA, Bergman MJ, Block JA Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) may be associated with substantial work disability, morbidity, costs, and increased mortality rates, often similar to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), documented in many published reports over the last 4 decades. However, OA generally has been viewed as less severe than RA. This discrepancy may be explained in part by:a) RA may have been considerably more severe in the past, prior to effective therapies.b) most older individuals have radiographic joint damage, which often is not associated with clinical symptoms.c) RA i...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Authors: Pincus T, Schmukler J, Castrejon I Abstract A patient history generally provides the most important information in diagnosis and management of patients with most rheumatic diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA). Patient history components can be expressed as quantitative, structured, "scientific" data, rather than "subjective" narrative descriptions, using patient self-report questionnaires. The Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) questionnaire is used in all OA clinical trials, and the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) in all rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials, as "diseas...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Authors: Cleveland RJ, Nelson AE, Callahan LF Abstract Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) are common, with osteoarthritis (OA) being the most prevalent. RMDs, including OA, are associated with significant pain and functional limitations, as well as mortality rates up to 1.6-fold higher than in the general population. Most studies of OA and mortality have focused on knee and hip OA. Some, but not all, of these studies suggest an increased risk of death, however risks may differ by region. Reasons for discordant findings may be due to methodological considerations including definition of OA, study design, ...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Authors: Hawker GA Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, affecting 1 in 3 people over age 65 and women more so than men. The prevalence of OA is rising due, in part, to the increasing prevalence of OA risk factors, including obesity, physical inactivity, and joint injury. OA-related joint pain causes functional limitations, poor sleep, fatigue, depressed mood and loss of independence. Compared to age and sex-matched peers, OA patients incur higher out of pocket health-related expenditures and substantial costs due to lost productivity. Most people with OA (59-87%) have at least one othe...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Authors: Zhang W Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. Pain and its related function and stiffness are currently the major symptoms and primary outcomes for treatment. However, the treatment in the past has been primarily targeting on the peripheral changes in the joint that has led to suboptimal outcomes. Recently, we find that people with OA respond better to treatment which targets on both peripheral and central pain abnormalities. We also find that placebo per se is very effective for OA. On average 75% pain reduction, 71% functional improvement and 83% stiffness improvement in the ...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Authors: Kwak DG, Kwak SG, Lee AY, Chang MC Abstract Lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis (FJOA) caused by degenerative change(s) is considered to be the main cause of facet joint-origin low back pain (LBP). Intra-articular lumbar facet joint (IA LFJ) corticosteroid injection is widely used for controlling pain induced by FJOA. In the current study, the outcomes of IA LFJ corticosteroid injection were evaluated according to the severity of FJOA. A total of 50 patients who received IA LFJ corticosteroid injections for the treatment of LFJ pain were recruited. Patients were classified into three groups according to the ...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
ConclusionThe definite diagnosis was not defined via vigorous myopathic and rheumatologic investigations. Detailed clinical examination and skeletal survey, followed by genotypic confirmation, were our fundamental pointers to rule out the false diagnosis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and rheumatoid polyarthritis in the adult group of patients. We wish to stress that the clinical/radiological phenotype is the baseline tool to establish a definite diagnosis and to guide the geneticist toward proper genotype.Key Points•Joint pain and difficulties in walking/climbing the stairs are characteristic features encountered i...
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) – Many Americans with aching joints are offered steroid injections to help ease their pain, but local researchers say those shots are causing more harm. Steroid injections, often combined with a local anesthetic, are commonly used to treat hip and knee pain associated with osteoarthritis.  Researchers at the Boston University School of Medicine reviewed data on hundreds of joint injections performed in 2018 and found that, in some patients, those shots were associated with acceleration of the arthritis, fractures, and bone loss. The researchers say that, while more study is needed, radiologists and ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston Arthritis Boston University School Of Medicine Source Type: news
The TV ad promises pain relief for knee osteoarthritis, the source of most of the 600,000 knee replacement surgeries performed in the US each year. A man in a bowling alley winces with pain. He nearly falls as he rolls a ball into the gutter. (Did I mention the arrow sticking out of his knee?) “Knee acting up again?” asks his buddy, clearly concerned. When pain pills don’t seem to help, his buddy suggests a procedure called Coolief for knee osteoarthritis. “I had it done six months ago,” says the bowling buddy. “And the best part is that it lasts up to one year.” What is Coolief? C...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Osteoarthritis Pain Management Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
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