IntraHealth ’s Jeanne Tessougué of Mali Honored as Heroine of Health during World Health Assembly

May 22, 2019Women in Global Health honored IntraHealth International ’sJeanne Tessougu é as a Heroine of Health Sunday during the 72nd annual World Health Assembly in Geneva. Tessougu é was one of seven women honored for their leadership in improving health care and advancing gender equality. The annual Heroines of Health awardshighlight women ’s major contributions to the global health care industry. Women currently hold 70% of jobs in the industry and contribute nearly $3 trillion to the health and social sectors,according to Women in Global Health, yet comprise a small percentage of global health leadership roles.As chief of party for theUSAID/Mali Human Resources for Health Activity, Tessougu é leads all aspects of the five-year project to strengthen Mali’s health workforce, scaling up advances in maternal and child survival, and protecting citizens from emerging health threats, such as Ebola and pandemic influenza.Dr. Jeanne Tessougu é is a force for women and girls throughout Mali.Tessougu é has deep expertise in community health and more than ten years of experience working in health systems strengthening. She manages the implementation, design, and monitoring and evaluation of health programs using a participatory community approach to reduce maternal, newborn, and infant mortalit y. Tessougu é has spent her career advocating for underserved populations, human rights, rural women, and youth in ...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Mali Mali Human Resources for Health Strengthening Activity World Health Assembly Health Workforce & Systems Source Type: news

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Source: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services] (HHS ASPR). Published: 12/2018. This spreadsheet from TRACIE (Technical Resources, Assistance Center, and Information Exchange) provides a planning tool designed to help hospitals determine approximate minimum personal protective equipment (PPE) based on special pathogen category and a number of facility-specific variables. Calculators are included for Ebola virus disease/viral hemorrhagic fever, Middle East respiratory syndrome/severe acute respiratory syndrome, and pandemic influenza. (Text)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Capacity building for influenza is critical because if you can prepare for and respond to flu outbreaks or respiratory events, you learn and practice for responses to other emerging diseases. Flu is not a sporadic outbreak like Ebola or Zika. It is always there, so there is always something to practice with and keep skills sharp. Because flu is a continual threat there is a lot of learning that goes on which also supports work on other emerging diseases. It ’s like the basic architecture for capacity building in all areas. For example, you can practice your communications for responding to outbreaks and better unders...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: immunization [subject], vaccination, influenza [subject], flu, seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza Source Type: news
AbstractAlmost all new treatments being developed for the next influenza pandemic target the virus. During the Ebola crisis in West Africa, patients were treated with an inexpensive generic statin/angiotensin receptor blocker combination that appeared to greatly improve survival. These drugs target the host response, not the virus, and probably reverse endothelial dysfunction. Scientists and health officials have shown little interest in this idea. Yet, during the early months of the next pandemic, vaccines will be unavailable and treatment options will be limited. Physicians should be prepared to undertake clinical trials...
Source: Journal of Public Health Policy - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Virus-like particles (VLPs) are protein-based structures that mimic viruses and bind to antibodies. Because VLPs aren't infectious, they show promise as vaccine platforms for many viral diseases, including influenza. Since details about influenza VLPs are scant, a team of researchers developed a 3D model based on the 1918 H1 pandemic influenza virus. The research, conducted by NIAID scientists, could benefit VLP vaccine projects, targeting a range of viruses from HIV to Ebola and SARS coronavirus.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Publication date: June 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 23Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. PfeifferAbstractMathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions. Howeve...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 22Author(s): Pierre Nouvellet, Anne Cori, Tini Garske, Isobel M. Blake, Ilaria Dorigatti, Wes Hinsley, Thibaut Jombart, Harriet L. Mills, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Maria D. Van Kerkhove, Christophe Fraser, Christl A. Donnelly, Neil M. Ferguson, Steven RileyAbstractOutbreaks of novel pathogens such as SARS, pandemic influenza and Ebola require substantial investments in reactive interventions, with consequent implementation plans sometimes revised on a weekly basis. Therefore, short-term forecasts of incidence are often of high priority. In light of the recent Ebola epidemic...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 23Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. PfeifferAbstractMathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions. Howeve...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 22Author(s): Pierre Nouvellet, Anne Cori, Tini Garske, Isobel M. Blake, Ilaria Dorigatti, Wes Hinsley, Thibaut Jombart, Harriet L. Mills, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Maria D. Van Kerkhove, Christophe Fraser, Christl A. Donnelly, Neil M. Ferguson, Steven RileyAbstractOutbreaks of novel pathogens such as SARS, pandemic influenza and Ebola require substantial investments in reactive interventions, with consequent implementation plans sometimes revised on a weekly basis. Therefore, short-term forecasts of incidence are often of high priority. In light of the recent Ebola epidemic...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 7 March 2018 Source:Antiviral Research Author(s): Leen Delang, Rana Abdelnabi, Johan Neyts Favipiravir, also known as T-705, is an antiviral drug that has been approved in 2014 in Japan to treat pandemic influenza virus infections. The drug is converted intracellularly into its active, phosphoribosylated form, which is recognized as a substrate by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Interestingly, besides its anti-influenza virus activity, this molecule is also able to inhibit the replication of flavi-, alpha-, filo-, bunya-, arena-, noro-, and of other RNA viruses, which include neg...
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
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