New Obesity Care Algorithm Addresses CVD, Diabetes, and Cancer New Obesity Care Algorithm Addresses CVD, Diabetes, and Cancer

New in this year's Obesity Medicine Association update, the document also explores how obesity causes cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, fatty liver, and cancer.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape FamilyMedicine Headlines - Category: Primary Care Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

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no De Lorenzo Lifestyle interventions remain the first-line treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), even if the optimal alimentary regimen is still controversial. The interest in antioxidants has increased over time, and literature reports an inverse association between nutrients rich in antioxidants and the risk of mortality due to non-communicable diseases, including NAFLD. Mediterranean diet (MD) is a model characterized by main consumption of plant-based foods and fish and reduced consumption of meat and dairy products. MD represents the gold standard in preventive medicine, probably due to the har...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Bianca Cox1†, Maria Tsamou1†, Karen Vrijens1, Kristof Y. Neven1, Ellen Winckelmans1, Theo M. de Kok2, Michelle Plusquin1 and Tim S. Nawrot1,3* 1Center for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium 2Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands 3Department of Public Health, Environment and Health Unit, Leuven University (KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium Maternal body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy is known to affect both fetal growth and later-life health of the newborn, yet the implicated molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. As the master reg...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Smith Etareri Evivie1,2†, Amro Abdelazez1,3, Bailiang Li1†, Xin Bian4, Wan Li1, Jincheng Du1, Guicheng Huo1* and Fei Liu1 1Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, College of Food Sciences, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China 2Food Science and Nutrition Unit, Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria 3Department of Dairy Microbiology, Animal Production Research Institute, Agriculture Research Center, Giza, Egypt 4Department of Food Engineering, Harbin University of Commerce, Harbin, China Foodborne pathogens are a ma...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Bariatric surgery appears to be capable of partially reversing the obesity-related epigenome. The identification of potential epigenetic biomarkers predictive for the success of bariatric surgery may open new doors to personalized therapy for severe obesity. Introduction Obesity is currently a huge healthcare problem, worldwide, and is a risk factor for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease and cancer (1). As the prevalence of obesity reaches pandemic proportions, this metabolic disease is estimated to become the biggest cause of mortality in the near future (2). In fact,...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion: The obesity-related SNP rs545854 was correlated with the serum uric acid level and risk of hyperuricemia in a male Chinese population. Therefore, men carrying this SNP could benefit from limiting their meat consumption to prevent hyperuricemia. These findings suggest an underlying genetic link between obesity and hyperuricemia worthy of further exploration. Introduction Serum uric acid (SUA) is a final product of the metabolic breakdown of purine oxidation (1). Since humans lack the gene for uricase that converts uric acid into a soluble form, the human uric acid level tends to be higher than that of othe...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Obesity is one of the major pandemics of the 21st century. In 2013 –2014, the prevalence of obesity in the US was>35% among men and 40% among women [1]. The World Health Organization (WHO) reported that 39% of men and 39% of women were overweight, and 11% of men and 15% of women were obese in 2016. Thus, approximately 2 billion adults worldwide were overweight and, among them, more than half a billion were obese [2]. Obesity is a chronic disease adversely affecting the quality of life and is associated with many comorbidities, like hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), cardiovascular disease (CVD), n...
Source: Metabolism - Clinical and Experimental - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Because it has become such a frequent item in everyday meals, suggesting that something so commonplace must be fine, people often ask: Is wheat really that bad? Let’s therefore catalog the health conditions that are associated with wheat consumption. Health conditions we know with 100% certainty are caused by consumption of wheat and related grains: Celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, cerebellar ataxia, “idiopathic” peripheral neuropathy, temporal lobe seizures, gluten encephalopathy, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, tooth decay Health conditions ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune diabetes gluten-free grain-free grains wheat wheat belly Source Type: blogs
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