Phenotypes favoring fractional exhaled nitric oxide discordance vs guideline based uncontrolled asthma.

Phenotypes favoring fractional exhaled nitric oxide discordance vs guideline based uncontrolled asthma. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2019 May 17;: Authors: Morphew T, Shin HW, Marchese S, Pires-Barracosa N, Galant SP PMID: 31108180 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 22 June 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Luisa Taylor, Morgan Waller, Jay PortnoyAbstractTelemedicine (TM) involves the use of technology to provide medical services to patients who live at a distance. It can be used asynchronously for interpretation of tests (spirometry, skin tests imaging studies), and for communication of information when the simultaneous presence of provider and patient is unnecessary. Synchronous encounters can be either unscheduled and initiated on-demand by patients or they can be facilitated substitutes for in-perso...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
A large number of studies have described that asthma is more frequent in males during childhood, with a switch to a female predominance after adolescence. This higher frequency of asthma in adult women has been largely attributed to the increment of estrogen and progesterone concentrations, as compared with those found during childhood.1-3 This rationale is mainly based on research performed in in vitro conditions and in animal models indicating that female sexual hormones enhance the innate and adaptive immune responses,4,5 potentially leading to airway inflammation and asthma.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Speaker: AstraZenca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Shire
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a severe respiratory syndrome characterized by asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP), and sensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) including aspirin manifested by acute upper and lower respiratory symptoms with exposure to this class of medications. (1) The prevalence of AERD is reported in 5.5% to 12.4 % of adult asthmatics, and rises to 21% when NSAID hypersensitivity is determined by provocation. (2-4) The management of asthma and CRSwNP in AERD should follow international guidelines including use of combination inhaled corticost...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Allergic asthma is a Type 2 (T2) inflammatory disease commonly presented in childhood. A complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors has been implicated in its pathogenesis.1 Environmental exposures seem to play an important role in the rising trend of the disease prevalence.1,2 There are several preventable environmental factors known to increase the risk of asthma in children such as damp and moldy housing or cigarette smoke.1,2,3
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Capsule Summary: The results of this cross-sectional study suggest that exposure to O3 and PM2.5 are risk factors for telomere shortening in non-asthmatic children. The use of inhaled corticosteroids may attenuate the risk of telomere shortening in children with asthma.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 June 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Erika J. Yoo, Nora L. Lee, Kelly P. Huang, Lara T. Kose, Deval Desai, Lauren A. Plante, Edward S. Schulman
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe effectiveness of LTRAs was not different from that of low-dose ICSs regarding the risk of asthma exacerbation in elderly patients with asthma in real-world settings. Given the practical benefits gained from convenient administration, LTRAs can be considered a reasonable alternative first-line therapy for elderly patients with mild asthma.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
AbstractPQ Grass represents an allergen ‐specific immunotherapy for pre‐seasonal treatment of patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (or rhinoconjunctivitis) with or without mild‐to‐moderate bronchial asthma. It consists of a native pollen extract for 13 grass species, chemically modified with glutaraldehyde, and adsorbed tol‐tyrosine in a microcrystalline form with addition of the adjuvant Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPL®). Previous non ‐clinical safety testing, including rat repeat dose toxicity in adult and juvenile animals, rat reproductive toxicity and rabbit local tolerance studies showed no safety find...
Source: Journal of Applied Toxicology - Category: Toxicology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
Authors: Čepelak I, Dodig S, Pavić I Abstract There is an increasing number of experimental, genetic and clinical evidence of atopic dermatitis expression as a pre-condition for later development of other atopic diseases such as asthma, food allergy and allergic rhinitis. Atopic dermatitis is a heterogeneous, recurrent childhood disease, also present in the adult age. It is increasingly attributed to systemic features and is characterized by immunological and skin barrier integrity and function dysregulation. To maintain the protective function of the skin barrier, in particular the maintenance of pH, hydration a...
Source: Biochemia Medica - Category: Biochemistry Tags: Biochem Med (Zagreb) Source Type: research
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