Stigmatizing language in news media coverage of the opioid epidemic: Implications for public health

Publication date: July 2019Source: Preventive Medicine, Volume 124Author(s): Emma E. McGinty, Elizabeth M. Stone, Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, Colleen L. BarryAbstractPublic stigma toward people who use illicit drugs impedes advancement of public health solutions to the opioid epidemic and reduces willingness to seek addiction treatment. Experimental studies show that use of certain terms, such as “addict” and “substance abuser,” exacerbate stigma while alternative terms, such as “person with a substance use disorder,” are less stigmatizing. We examine the frequency with which stigmatizing terms and less-stigmatizing alternatives are used in U.S. news media coverage of the opioid epidemic.We analyzed 6399 news stories about the opioid epidemic published/aired by high-circulation and high-viewership U.S. national and regional print and television news outlets from July 2008 through June 2018. We calculated the proportion of news stories mentioning terms shown to be stigmatizing, as well as terms shown to be less-stigmatizing alternatives, in randomized experiments. Data was collected during May through August 2018 and analyzed in September 2018. Over the 10-year study period, 49% of news stories about the opioid epidemic mentioned any stigmatizing term and 2% mentioned any less-stigmatizing alternative. The proportion of news stories mentioning stigmatizing terms over the 10-year study period increased from 37% in July 2008–June 2009 to 45...
Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

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Abstract Primary care physicians and practice teams increasingly recognize the need to take a role in addressing the growing epidemic of opioid use disorder (OUD) and opioid-related drug overdose deaths, but face considerable challenges in doing so. Through its work supporting practice transformation efforts, sharing innovations, and connecting key sectors within communities, the Network for Regional Healthcare Improvement and several of its member regional health improvement collaboratives have identified innovative ways to support physicians and practice teams in transforming practice in ways that address a spec...
Source: Annals of Family Medicine - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Ann Fam Med Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Pain Management Vitamins and supplements Source Type: blogs
(BOSTON) — Parents who lost children to fatal overdoses and other addiction recovery activists are rallying outside a Boston courthouse Friday as a judge hears arguments in Massachusetts’ lawsuit against Purdue Pharma over its role in the national drug epidemic. About 100 protesters gathered in front of Suffolk County Superior Court before the start of the hearing, placing poster boards filled with photos of hundreds of overdose victims on the courthouse steps. One bore the words “Always loved, never forgotten.” Another: “We march for those who can’t.” A full-size skeleton covered ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Courts Massachusetts onetime Source Type: news
Oklahoma's attorney general on Wednesday made his final bid to force Johnson&Johnson to pay $17 billion for its part in fueling the opioid epidemic, saying the drugmaker's "egregious" marketing caused an oversupply of addictive drugs and overdose deaths.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
The current opioid crisis has raised awareness of the risks of misuse, addiction, and overdose with opioid prescribing for pain management in the perioperative and nonoperative care of surgical patients. Despite these risks, it is essential for surgical providers to provide safe and adequate functional pain control to enhance recovery. The purpose of this review is to outline the relevance of the US opioid crisis to surgical prescribing, describe strategies for opioid reduction using a stepwise therapy approach, and provide recommendations for improving the safety of opioid prescribing. Additional recommendations for risk ...
Source: Surgical Clinics of North America - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Publishers The Fix Drugs Law Enforcement opiods Police Officers Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: A high level of willingness to wear an overdose detection device was observed in this setting and a range of factors associated with overdose were positively associated with willingness. Since some factors, such as homelessness may be a barrier, further research is needed to investigate explanations for unwillingness and to evaluate real world acceptability of a wearable overdose detection devices as this technology becomes available. PMID: 31269963 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Addiction Science and Clinical Practice - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Sci Clin Pract Source Type: research
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Source: Nursing Outlook - Category: Nursing Authors: Source Type: research
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 2018), an estimated 68% of the 70,200 drug overdose deaths in the United States (US) in 2017 involved the use of an opioid. In fact, the number of drug overdose deaths that implicated opioids increased six-fold between 1999 and 2017 (CDC, 2018). In the current climate of the opioid addiction epidemic, various stakeholders are calling for tighter opioid access policies, more rigorous prescribing standards, and increasingly tailored patient and community education mechanisms (Christie et al., 2017; National Academies of Sciences [NAS], 2017; National Academy of Medicine, 2017).
Source: Nursing Outlook - Category: Nursing Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - Category: Rural Health Source Type: news
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